Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Says if Male Politicians Could Get Pregnant, They'd Build Planned Parenthood Clinics Everywhere

New York congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez continues to use social media to call out politicians who have voted to enact stricter abortion laws.

The Democrat has penned several tweets on the issue since Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed the state's newest abortion law, considered by many to be the most restrictive in the United States, on Wednesday. The freshman lawmaker's latest comments came after she retweeted singer and two-time Oscar-winning actress Barbra Streisand.

"If these male GOP elected officials could get pregnant, there would be free abortion nationwide," Streisand tweeted alongside a link to an opinion column published by the New York Times.

Ocasio-Cortez retweeted Streisand, saying, "If male politicians could get pregnant, there would be as many Planned Parenthood clinics as there are Post Offices."

On Wednesday, Ocasio-Cortez also tweeted about multiple abortion laws that have passed in various states, saying that the "bans aren't just about controlling women's bodies," but about overseeing a woman's sexuality through limiting birth control and banning "comprehensive" sex education classes.

"U.S. religious fundamentalists are working hard to outlaw sex that falls outside their theology," Ocasio-Cortez said.

In a follow-up tweet, the New York representative said, "Ultimately, this is about women's power. When women are in control of their sexuality, it threatens a core element underpinning right-wing ideology: patriarchy. It's a brutal form of oppression to seize control of the one essential thing a person should command: their own body."

Alabama's abortion bill, which passed by an overwhelming majority in both the House and the Senate, bans abortion unless the woman has a medical emergency that threatens her life. The bill is expected to go into effect in six months, though the measure will be challenged in court by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

The organization tweeted their intentions on Tuesday, minutes after the Alabama state Senate voted to pass the bill and send it to Ivey for her signature.

"You can't say we didn't warn you, @GovernorKayIvey. See you in court," the ACLU tweeted on Wednesday after Ivey signed the bill.

The ACLU is also challenging a bill in Ohio that restricts abortion after six weeks. The Ohio law, set to go into effect on July 10, allows for no exceptions for women who are raped or conceive a child as a result of incest.

"Legally, this case is straightforward. A ban on abortion is blatantly unconstitutional under more than 45 years of Supreme Court precedent starting with Roe v. Wade. The Ohio law we've challenged today flies in the face of that precedent and of the Constitution. We've asked the court to block the law before it can take effect on July 10," the ACLU said in a blog post on their website.

Ohio is among the states that have passed laws that are commonly referred to as "heartbeat" bills, so-named as the limit for abortions are often set at six weeks, the time in which a fetus' heartbeat can often be detected by a medical professional. Critics have condemned the bill as some women do not learn they are pregnant until the six week mark of a pregnancy, eliminating their right to choose abortion under the law in some states.

Mississippi and Kentucky have both passed similar laws, both of which are being challenged in court and have not yet gone into effect. Other states, including Louisiana and South Carolina, are currently debating similar abortion laws in their state legislatures.

In Alabama, an abortion conducted except in cases of a medical emergency will be classified as a felony. Doctors who perform the procedure would be charged with a Class A felony which could see a prison sentence of life to 99 years. Doctors who attempt an abortion would be a Class C felony and include a prison sentence of up to 10 years.

The law has drawn criticism as a doctor who performs an abortion or attempts the procedure could be sentenced to more prison time than a male who rapes and subsequently impregnants a woman.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) arrives to a House Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Subcommittee hearing on confronting white supremacy at the U.S. Capitol on May 15, 2019 in Washington, DC. During the hearing, subcommittee members and witnesses discussed the impact on the communities most victimized and targeted by white supremacists. Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images