Video Shows Americans Training Ukrainians to Fight Off Russian Invasion

Americans who quit their jobs and traveled to Ukraine to give local civilians military training were filmed leading self-defense classes on Saturday, amid flaring tensions and fears of an invasion by Russia.

"These people they are mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, they just to protect their families, protect what's theirs," said William, an American from California who is training Ukrainian civilians amid the threat of war.

"If I can come over here and help them, teach them combat, medicine, anything they need...it's important to me," he said.

Civilians were shown following commands, dropping to the floor with weapons in their hands, and taking aim.

Adam from South Carolina, who also assists with military training, said he was working in the IT field full time before he decided to travel to Ukraine and help out with teaching.

"I heard about this conflict ramping back up, back in November. And so I decided with the time that I have on Earth to use my skills to help these people."

"Everyone is extremely eager to learn. It's quite sad to see people who should really just have to live their lives and do what they want, and not having to prepare for war. But it's also very inspiring that they are willing to do so," he said.

Adam said that, so far, he has trained a total of 120 civilians.

"Quite sad to see people who should just live their lives are preparing for war," said Adam, who also assists with military training. "But it's also very inspiring that they are willing to do so."

He explained that he and his teammates teach a variety of essential skills, including tactics, hand signals, how to hold a weapon and "manipulate it so that you're not pointing at the wrong person."

"We're also teaching them a little bit about the principles of reconnaissance and how to scope out enemy positions and subvert an attack," Adam said.

William said he will also be assisting with teaching medicine classes for civilians.

It comes as tensions continue to intensify between Ukraine and Russia. Ukrainian forces and Kremlin-backed rebels traded accusations of shelling in Ukraine's breakaway enclaves on Monday.

Moscow has consistently denied that it is planning to invade, although Western officials have estimated some 150,000 Russian troops are massed at the border with Ukraine.

On Monday, the Center for Public Relations (PSC) of Russia's military service FSB accused Ukrainian forces of destroying a post for border guards some 160 yards from Russia's border with Ukraine.

"This is simply untrue," Ukraine's defense ministry responded, accusing Russia of spreading misinformation. "The building depicted in the pictures and videos spread by the Russian propaganda media outlets looks a lot more like a small storage shed than a border guard post."

The U.S. has warned that Russia may fabricate a "pretext" to justify an invasion of Ukraine.

The White House on Sunday night said that President Joe Biden "accepted in principle" a meeting with his Russian counterpart, but only "if an invasion hasn't happened."

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Americans have quit their jobs to voluntarily teach Ukraine civilians military training, as fears grow of a possible Moscow-led invasion of Ukraine. Newsflare/FNTV