FOR A HAPPY HEART

The Japanese have a word for it--karoshi, or "death by overwork." But can stress on the job really do you in? Finnish researchers decided to find out. The years 1991 to 1993 in Finland were as bad as it generally gets economically, with unemployment nearly tripling to 17 percent.

SEARCH FOR THE SACRED

The 550 residents of Kibbutz Tzuba, a few miles down the road from Jerusalem toward Tel Aviv, mostly just want to be "left alone in their own little patch," Yael Kerem says apologetically.

A DISEASE IN DISGUISE

What do you call a headache that lasts five years? Andy Eckl of Trumbull, Conn., came down with a skull-splitter in 1997, when he was 5 years old, and he got no relief until he was 10.

What You Don't Know About Fat

FAT CELLS: THE AVERAGE PERSON HAS 40 BILLION OF THEM. THEY MULTIPLY, THEY'RE ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO KILL AND THEY'RE SENDING MESSAGES TO YOUR BODY THAT CAN RUIN YOUR HEALTH

MEDICINE | MORE THAN A STATIN

For those Americans battling cholesterol, new help is on the way. Think reductions of 50 to 60 percent in "bad cholesterol," or LDL. That's with a new pill called Vytorin, approved by the FDA two weeks ago and set to reach pharmacies by Labor Day.

HEALTH CARE: HOSPITAL HORRORS

In 1999 the Institute of Medicine announced that as many as 98,000 Americans die every year from medical errors. Shocking as that revelation was, now it seems the estimate may have been low.

SECOND ACTS

Hathaway Pendergrass, 20, knew from the age of 6 that he wanted to go to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. But as a local resident competing against a crush of other hometown applicants, he lost out, despite his 3.9 average.

WAS THE BARD A WOMAN?

For more than 150 years, literary sleuths have questioned whether William Shakespeare--a man with a grammar-school education, at best--could possibly have penned some of the greatest works in the English language. "You can be born with intelligence, but you can't be born with book learning," says Mark Rylance, Shakespearean actor and artistic director of the Globe Theatre in London.

WAS SHAKESPEARE A SHE?

For more than 150 years, literary sleuths have questioned whether William Shakespeare--a man with only a grammar-school education, at best--could possibly have penned the greatest works in the English language.

IN THE NEWS: KIDS AND DEPRESSION

Just 20 years ago, medical schools taught that children don't get clinical depression. Now the National Institute of Mental Health says about 4 percent of teens have it at any given time, and many of them are taking antidepressants like Prozac.

KISSED BY A FROG

Think you know frogs? Think again. In its new crowd-pleaser of a show, "Frogs: A Chorus of Colors," the American Museum of Natural History in New York highlights a range of freaky amphibians, from the waxy monkey frog, which climbs trees, to the Vietnamese moss frog, which looks remarkably like a clump of moss. (Just try to find all 14 in the live display!) Can't make it to New York?

AN ASPIRIN A DAY?

An aspirin a day can help prevent heart attacks. It may also ward off breast cancer, according to a study last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Fresh Weapons For An Old Battle

Anyone who has survived chemotherapy knows how brutal it can be. But thanks to an experimental procedure, Barbara Link, 55, of Cary, North Carolina, found that parts of the treatment were "actually pleasant." Her enthusiasm is all the more surprising because she was given two especially toxic drugs in high doses.

HEALTH: FACE THE REALITY

TV's new makeover shows are modern fairy tales, turning ugly ducklings into radiant brides with such apparent ease that plastic surgeons, of all people, worry that audiences are being misled. "This is real surgery with real risks--and the more procedures you get at once, the greater the complications and recovery time," says Dr.

DOUGHNUTS IN THE DARK

Shelly's Snack Shop was the name that Brian Egemo of Badger, Iowa, applied to his wife's side of the bed. In 1994 Shelly, who had been a sleepwalker as a child, began sleepwalking again.

SCARY LESSONS OF 1918

It was "only influenza," public-health officials said. But when a team of military doctors arrived at the U.S. Army's Camp Devens outside Boston in early September 1918, they saw immediately that this was no ordinary flu.

STARVE YOUR WAY TO HEALTH

If the world is divided into people who live to eat and those who eat to live, perhaps there ought to be a third category for Brian Delaney. At nearly 1.8 meters and 63 kilograms, Delaney, 40, is really, really thin.

NOW, REDUCE YOUR RISK OF ALZHEIMER'S

Just days into 2004, are you already struggling with those New Year's resolutions to eat right, exercise and shed excess pounds? Here's added incentive to stick with the program.

STARVE YOUR WAY TO HEALTH

If the world is divided into people who live to eat and those who eat to live, perhaps there ought to be a third category for Brian Delaney. At 5 feet 11 inches and 139 pounds, Delaney, 40, is really, really thin.

NOW, REDUCE YOUR RISK OF ALZHEIMER'S

Just days into 2004, are you already struggling with those New Year's resolutions to eat right, exercise and shed excess pounds? Here's added incentive to stick with the program.

Into The Darkness Of The Mind

When Wayne Huizenga of Blockbuster fame bought the Miami Dolphins football team in 1994, he asked a trusted colleague to write the $127 million check: Gillian Bristol of Florida.

In The News: A Kinder Scope

Been putting off that colonoscopy? Plenty of folks do, which helps explain why colon cancer claims 57,000 lives a year. Now there may be an alternative. Last week The New England Journal of Medicine published a major study on a new 3-D "virtual colonoscopy." Researchers at three Navy and Army hospitals gave 1,233 patients both traditional and virtual exams.

When The Body Attacks Itself

The immune system is a thing of beauty--subtle enough to distinguish dangerous invaders like viruses from benign interlopers such as food; clever enough to recognize when the body's supposedly friendly cells turn cancerous and should be eliminated.

That's Why We Call It Junk Food

Few foods are more alluring than fine chocolate, with its seductive blend of complex sweetness and velvety texture--and few become the object of such ardent obsessions. "Chocolate is a drug of abuse in its own category," jokes Dr.

Into The Darkness Of The Mind

When Wayne Huizenga of Blockbuster fame bought the Miami Dolphins in 1994, he asked a trusted colleague to write the $127 million check: Gillian Bristol of Ft.

When The Body Attacks Itself

The immune system is a thing of beauty--subtle enough to distinguish dangerous invaders like viruses from benign interlopers such as food; clever enough to recognize when the body's supposedly friendly cells turn cancerous and should be eliminated.

Real Rhapsody In Blue

As a child, Julian Asher had a theory about the symphony concerts he attended with his parents. "I thought they turned down the lights so you could see the colors better," he says, describing the "Fantasia"-like scenes that danced before his eyes.

Health: Popeye's New Peril?

If you like juicy, ripe peaches--and who doesn't?--the nonprofit Environmental Working Group in Washington has some bad news for you. This succulent fruit tops the list of foods most contaminated with pesticide residues.

The Magic Of Mushrooms

Holy shiitake! That--in short, unscientific terms--is the reaction of researchers hunting for potential new medicines in mushrooms. Tests in lab dishes indicate that fabulous fungi with names like lion's mane and turkey tail harbor novel antiviral and antibacterial compounds.

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