Barbara Kantrowitz

Brush With Perfection

Without the fat lip and the funeral, who knows how this story would have turned out? The fat lip belonged to New York Times writer Alex Kuczynski. The funeral was for her close friend Jerry Nachman, a journalist who died of cancer in 2003.

Is Your College a Lemon?

When you're in the market for a new car, you read reviews of various makes, visit dealers and go for a few test-drives. You want to know about things like gas mileage, repair costs and resale value.

The Royal Treatment

When Helen Mirren was growing up in postwar London, millions of Britons revered the royal family. Mirren's parents were not among them. "They didn't like the class system, and the royal family is the pinnacle of the class system," she says. "I was brought up very antimonarchist." Mirren recalls being "a bit cheeky" herself about the royals in her younger days: "I was a little uppity about why the queen won't smile. 'Does it hurt her to smile?

Health: Reducing Your Risk

Can you still fit into the dress you wore to your high-school graduation? If so, congratulations. You may have significantly reduced your risk of breast cancer, according to a study last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

What Makes a High School Great?

Gold stars: The answer depends on the school, and the student. With its annual list, NEWSWEEK honors top schools that help regular kids succeed in college. From the issue dated May 8, 2006. Click here to read Newsweek's 2007 Top High Schools coverage.

The Quest for Rest

Like many mothers of young children, Martha Yasso was tired all the time--so tired that whenever her 3-year-old son went down for a nap, she grabbed the chance to rest as well.

The Quest For Rest

Millions of women suffer from sleeplessness at stages throughout their lives. Researchers are beginning to understand why--and to develop new ways to help.

Health: Building Strong Bones

For years, doctors have been telling women to take calcium after menopause to keep their bones strong and prevent fractures. And women have complied, making calcium the top seller in the multibillion-dollar dietary-supplement industry.

When Women Lead

As a growing number of female executives rise to the top, how will they change the culture of the workplace?

FOOD: THE SCHOOL OF JULIA

In the summer of 2002, Julie Powell's prospects seemed bleak. Despite a degree from Amherst and "seven years of three-quarters-finished novels in drawers," she was still a 29-year-old New York secretary with rapidly fading big dreams. "As 29-year-olds are wont to do," says Powell, "I started obsessing over all of this, spinning my wheels and getting all bent out of shape." Out of "this stew of angst and anxiety" popped an idea--a rather bizarre idea.

LEGAL AT LAST

It took more than three decades, countless illicit assignations, two divorces and then perhaps a bit of divine intervention to keep threatened rain away. But last week, under clear skies, amid a sea of fabulous hats only English women can get away with, Prince Charles finally married the woman he says he's always loved: Camilla Parker Bowles.

NOW YOU ASK ME?

He loves her. She loves him. That's the short version. The longer story is... well, much longer, and involves upending royal tradition and a religious crisis--along with the cuckolding of the Silver Stick in Waiting and erotic chat about a tampon.

SEX AND SCIENCE

When Amber Post started grad school in physics at Princeton, her goal was the same as her male colleagues': a tenure-track job at a major university. Now with her Ph.D.

SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGH

Susan Hockfield has many goals as MIT's new president, but the first she mentions is this: "I want to provide optimism and aspiration for people whose phenotype doesn't match the dominant phenotype." She's already fulfilled that ambition just by being herself, a distinguished neurobiologist whose last job was provost of Yale University.

The Power of No

IT'S AN UNANTICIPATED LEGACY OF THE AFFLUENT '90S: PARENTS WHO CAN'T, OR WON'T, SET LIMITS. NOW A GROWING NUMBER OF PSYCHOLOGISTS ARE WARNING OF THE DANGERS OF OVERINDULGENCE AND TEACHING HOW--AND WHERE--TO DRAW THE LINE.

HOT SCHOOLS

Pull apart the DNA of a student's dream school and you'll find so many different strands. Perhaps it's the location, either in the rolling country- side far from anything resembling a sidewalk, or in the midst of a hip urban neighborhood.

AMERICA'S 25 HOT SCHOOLS

COMPETITION'S INTENSE AND THERE ARE SCORES OF COLLEGES. LARGE, SMALL, PUBLIC, PRIVATE, URBAN, RURAL--WHAT'S BEST FOR YOU? HERE ARE OUR TOP PICKS FOR THE PLACES THAT EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT FOR 2005

DROPPING THE H BOMB

At some point in their encounters with the outside world, Harvard students are forced to admit that they do attend Harvard, not just some school "in Boston" (the preferred understated approach).

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