The Saudi 'Sex & and the City'?

When Rajaa Alsanea's "The Girls of Riyadh" hit bookstores in the Middle East in 2005, it caused a furor. Referred to by some as a "Sex and the City" for Saudi Arabia, the book delved into the social, romantic—and sometimes sex—lives of its four female characters. Published first in Lebanon—and published in the United States this month—the book almost immediately made its way to Saudi Arabia, where it was denounced by religious conservatives as immoral and hailed by reformists as a...

Does Your Child Need a Personal Trainer?

Like many 13-year-olds, Adam Hillen likes sports. As a seventh grader in Mason, Ohio, he plays on his junior high school's football and wrestling teams. But his father became concerned when Adam began working out with his friends. "He would go to the weight room with a bunch of kids, and I just thought that invited injury," says Doug Hillen.So he took Adam to meet Doug Gibson, a personal trainer and president of Sensible Fitness in nearby Blue Ash. "I wanted Adam to learn the right way to lift...

Bought to Be Sold

Every year, close to 65,000 dogs are used for medical research in the United States. How do laboratories get the animals? Some come from licensed "Class A" dealers, who specifically breed dogs for research. But the majority of dogs are acquired from Class B dealers, who are also licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture—but who can obtain their dogs from various sources, including unlicensed sellers known as bunchers, for as little as $20.The transactions are legal if the bunchers can...

ORGANS: NOTEWORTHY PROBLEM

The biggest mystery in Europe this year isn't "The Da Vinci Code"--it's the question of what is killing the Continent's great pipe organs. That is the issue confounding scientists, music historians and organ experts involved with the EU-funded Corrosion of Lead and Lead-Tin Alloys of Organ Pipes in Europe (COLLAPSE), a research project formed when a mysterious corrosion began appearing in the hollow cylinders of some of Europe's oldest and most venerable instruments. One of the first incidents...

'An Evolution'

Democratic Rep. Barney Frank is known for his witty candor and his dedication to liberal causes, particularly gay rights. One of the few openly gay members of Congress, Frank had been in Washington six years before he came to out to his colleagues, and the nation, in 1987. Two years later he found himself embroiled in a sex scandal with a male prostitute named Stephen Gobie that thrust him into the spotlight--and before the House Ethics Committee. But Frank's constituency, Massachusetts's...

SNAP JUDGMENT: BOOKS

BOOKSThe Outlaw Seaby William LangewiescheThe ocean is a realm that remains radically free," warns the author, describing a largely unregulated global shipping industry that leaves crews vulnerable to pirates and poorly maintained vessels susceptible to sinking. One such ship, the Estonia, went down in 1994 because of a broken bow visor, killing more than 800 people--an accident recounted here in riveting detail. Even more alarming are the opportunities the anarchic ocean offers to terrorists...

Snap Judgment: Books

Occidentalism by Ian Buruma and Avishai MargalitIslamic jihadists don't have a monopoly on hating the West. As this slim volume shows, West-bashers have a long pedigree, from Japanese intellectuals to Russian Slavophiles. The authors gather their dehumanizing images of the West under the rubric of Occidentalism. But even more interesting than the examples is the key insight that "most revolts against Western imperialism have borrowed from Western ideas." That makes confronting them all the more...

Calling All Moms, Again

On Aug. 10, 1999, Donna Dees-Thomases became an activist. That's the day she witnessed on television a shooting at a Jewish community center day camp in Granada Hills, Calif., an incident that left five people wounded, three of them children. Hours later she was online researching gun control and was shocked to find how few gun laws exist in the United States. Those that do have "such giant loopholes that I could drive my minivan through them," Dees-Thomases says in her new book, "Looking for a...

Q&Amp;A: 'Democrats Do Have A Prayer'

The Democratic Leadership Council bills itself as a movement that seeks to "go beyond the old left-right debate." Its philosophy embraces centrist ideals such as fiscal discipline, economic growth and welfare reform--in short, the so-called Third Way adopted by Bill Clinton.Recently, however, the DLC has come under fire from members of its own party for warning liberal Dems not to stray from those middle-of-the road principles.Al From, the DLC's founder and CEO, spoke to NEWSWEEK's Christina B....

Q&Amp;A: Can We Ever Justify War?

The book documents the mass killings of the last half of the 20th century--from Pol Pot's slaughter of Cambodians to concentration camps in the former Yugoslavia--and analyzes the United States' reluctance, and sometimes outright refusal, to get involved. It also shows the struggle of the few officials who sought to intervene but went largely ignored.On Wednesday, "A Problem From Hell" was awarded the prize for nonfiction by the National Book Critics Circle. Power is currently the executive...