New 'Livability' Guidelines for Transit Projects: What They Do and Don't Change

Lost in the shuffle of Haiti and the Massachusetts Senate race was an interesting development in federal transport policy. Advocates of public transportation and sustainable transportation development have had a frustrating few months, but Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood threw them a bone Wednesday with new guidelines for spending.

Obama Rolls Out First Concrete Haiti Relief Steps

Howard Fineman wrote in this space yesterday that President Obama would feel pressured to come out with a strong response to the earthquake in Haiti as a result of both the memory of Hurricane Katrina and the racial makeup of the nation.

Rove Divorces, Twitter Delights

When Karl Rove announced this morning that he and wife Darby had divorced last week after 24 years of marriage, family spokesperson (and former Bush press secretary) Dana Perino asked for the family's privacy to be respected.

Stimulus Bill Heavily Weighted to Highways, As Expected

Last week, I reported on some transportation advocates' concern about a jobs stimulus bill: [L]awmakers are working on a stimulus bill that would spend tens of billions of dollars on infrastructure but do little to remake a flawed financing and planning system.

Obama Warned You--The Senate Can Be A Mess

The commonly cited reason for the White House's detachment from crafting health legislation has been the 1994 debacle: President Obama and his advisers have seen what happens when the White House overreaches onto senators' turf.

Conservative Media on Fort Hood Shooting

A look at the conservative media this morning shows a variety of approaches to the Fort Hood shooting. While most commentators are interested in addressing the question of Islamic terror, and particularly homegrown Islamism, there's clearly a concern in many quarters to avoid generalizations or overstatements--although others, like Michelle Malkin, have decided to go full-speed ahead.

Dems Might Be the Party of the Rich, But What About the Middle Class?

USA Today presents some interesting, if perhaps not groundbreaking, numbers on socioeconomic representation in Congress today. According to the report, which is based on analysis of census data, Democratic members of the House of Representatives now represent most of the nation's wealthiest people, a sharp turnaround from the long-standing dominance that Republicans have held over affluent districts ...

Are There John McCain Birthers, Too?

Yesterday, Public Policy Polling released results of a poll showing that 42 percent of Republicans nationwide do not believe Barack Obama was born in the United States.

Kaddafi Is Right About the U.N.

There was plenty to dismiss in Muammar Kaddafi's endless tirade at the United Nations this afternoon─like the idea that the H1N1 epidemic might be a corporate or military weapon that escaped from a lab, or his oft-made call for a single Israeli and Palestinian state called "Isratine." And he didn't even go into his proposal to abolish Switzerland.

Another Blockbuster Bush Tell-All

In an article in this month's issue of GQ, ex-presidential speechwriter Matt Latimer becomes the latest former George W. Bush aide to publish embarrassing revelations about life in the Bush White House.

Gaffe by Tweet: Top 10 Social-Media Slip-Ups

Sooner or later, anything trendy makes its way to the world of politics. This year, it's been the advent of the microblog. Hundreds of politicians have flocked to the microblogging services like Facebook and Twitter over the past few months, heralding it's ability to help them keep in touch with folks back home.

Nations that Gave up on Nuclear Bombs

For all the fear that proliferation creates, there are fewer nuclear powers now than in years past. A look at the nations that chased (or even acquired) the bomb but eventually gave it up.

Pages