David Ansen

Frost/Nixon review

On Broadway, Peter Morgan's "Frost/Nixon" made for a deliciously smart and dramatic mano a mano between the disgraced former president and the slick, jet-setting British TV interviewer David Frost, whose career, and his personal fortune, depended on his getting an on-air confession about Watergate.

Review: Ansen on 'Revolutionary Road'

There are few better portraits of marriage gone wrong than the one depicted in Richard Yates's 1961 novel "Revolutionary Road." With surgical precision, Yates brings us deep inside the trapped lives of Frank and April Wheeler, a 1950s couple whose youthful dreams have been sacrificed on the altar of suburban comfort, conformity and compromise.

Doubt review

A passionate liberal priest goes toe-to-toe with an inflexible, authoritarian mother superior in John Patrick Shanley's theatrical barnburner "Doubt." Sister Aloysius (Meryl Streep) has decided, with little evidence but her unyielding moral certitude, that the charismatic Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman) has been paying "inappropriate" attention to Donald Stewart, the first black student at the St.

Reader Review

Bernhard Schlink's "The Reader" was a terse, morally complex, erotically charged novel that examined the impact of German guilt on the generation born after the Holocaust.

"Waltz With Bashir" Review

Ari Folman was a 19-year-old Israeli soldier in the 1982 war in Lebanon. But he had suppressed almost all memories of that time until 20 years later, when a friend recounted a recurring nightmare of a pack of snarling, vicious dogs marauding the streets of Tel Aviv.

Review: "A Christmas Tale" By Arnaud Desplechin

The holiday family-reunion movie is often as excruciating and treacly as the fraught, multigenerational gatherings it depicts. Rare is the masterwork, like Bergman's "Fanny and Alexander," which shows Yuletide festivities so magically you want to linger inside them forever.

Worth Your Time: 'A Christmas Tale'

The holiday family reunion movie is often as excruciating and treacly as the fraught, multigenerational gatherings it depicts. (Recent example: "The Family Stone.") Rare is the masterwork, like Bergman's "Fanny and Alexander," that depicts Yuletide festivities so magically you want to linger inside them forever.

Damiano, director of "Deep Throat," Dies at 80

Gerald Damiano, 80, Adult FilmmakerHe made other films and held other jobs, but Gerald Damiano will always be known as the man who made "Deep Throat." Produced for a mere $25,000, the film grossed as much as $600 million—though the profits went to the mobsters who financed it, and not to the man who made it in a Miami motel room."Deep Throat" opened in Times Square in June 1972, spawning a phenomenon called "porno chic." It was the first porn flick that people took their dates to see;...

The Wrestler Triumphs

Mickey Rourke once gave up acting to become a boxer. In 'The Wrestler,' he's simply a knockout.

(Not) Worth Your Time: An Un-'Wanted' Movie

The trailers for the action movie "Wanted" promise some hot romantic sparks between stars Angelina Jolie and James McAvoy. "Is this when we start to bond?" asks McAvoy. "Would you like to?" Jolie purrs.

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