Worth Your Time: "Breaking the Slump"

Watching Tiger Woods, perhaps the most mentally tough athlete of all time, dominate the PGA Tour, you can forget how insidiously difficult golf actually is. It's such a lonely game, especially when played in front of huge galleries and millions of TV viewers. It isolates athletes like no other sport, setting them out there on the grass, all alone, with just their clubs, the ball, their talent and their twitchy, tortured minds.In his new book, "Breaking the Slump," NBC sports reporter Jimmy...

More Information, Please

When Dr. Delos "Toby" Cosgrove started his career as a cardiothoracic surgeon in the 1970s, he found that the doctor-patient relationship was essentially a one-way street. "The doctor was the repository of information," says Cosgrove, now the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic. "The patients came to you, you told them what they should do and they generally did it." By the time Cosgrove was ready to hang up his scalpel—he stopped operating last December—the basic equation had changed dramatically....

And the Beat Goes On

More than 20 percent of the coronary bypass operations in the country are done 'off pump,' with the heart pounding in the chest like the living thing it is.

A Little Bit Louder, Please

More than 28 million Americans have some degree of hearing loss, a number that could reach 78 million by 2030. The latest science, new treatments--and how to protect yourself.

A Conversation With a Basketball Legend

Renowned UCLA coach John Wooden, who led the Bruins to 10 NCAA championships, died Friday night at 99. In 2005, NEWSWEEK spoke with Wooden about Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and whether the dunk should be banned. Read the interview.

Altered States

Hypnosis can help with problems from anxiety to pain. How it works, and what it does in the brain.

ALTERED STATES

At 27, Beth, an Indiana housewife, came down with chronic diarrhea that plagued her for the next three years. "I knew where every bathroom in town was," she says with a laugh. But it was no joke. "I didn't really want to go out at night because it's just not fun." Doctor after doctor told her it was stress-related. She tried diet changes and medicines, but nothing helped. Then she went to see Dr. Marc Oster, a Chicago-area psychologist. After 12 sessions of hypnosis with Oster, during which...

FAST BREAK TO THE BIG TIME

The squeak of basketball shoes on hardwood, the chirp of whistles, the thump thump thump of the ball. The familiar sounds echoed through the gym on Chicago's Near North Side as a bunch of high-school kids zipped and soared through their best moves. Many of the players were friends--they'd been sharing courts for years--but this was no mere game. It was serious business, with millions of dollars at stake. It was a practice session for the EA Sports Roundball Classic, a national all-star game...

Why Don't We Call Them Quirky?

Like the conscientious pediatricians they are, Perri Klass and Eileen Costello keep up with the ever-evolving vocabulary of childhood dysfunction. They know all about autistic spectrum disorder, sensory integration dysfunction, pervasive developmental disorder, Asperger's syndrome and more. They've waded through the medical literature and analyzed the studies. They know the clinical nuances that distinguish the diagnoses. They've seen hundreds of kids, counseled and comforted hundreds of...

A New Age For Aarp

William Novelli had a hell of a week. Last Monday at the White House, President George W. Bush personally thanked him and AARP, the huge organization of seniors Novelli heads, for endorsing a Republican bill to add prescription-drug coverage to Medicare. On Tuesday, at a New Hampshire debate sponsored by AARP, top Democratic presidential candidates ripped the organization's leadership for its support of the legislation, which they say will undermine Medicare and threaten the health of millions...

Tip Sheet

HealthBreast Cancer's 'New Era'Breast-cancer patients deserve good news, and they got a nice helping of it last week when a large, international clinical trial was halted early because the drug being tested was found to dramatically reduce the risk of relapse. The findings for the drug, letrozole--manufactured by Novartis and sold under the brand name Femara--electrified researchers and prompted them to abort the double-blind study of 5,187 women with early-stage disease and offer the...

Health: Breast Cancer's 'New Era'

Breast cancer patients deserve good news, and they got a nice helping of it last week when a large, international clinical trial was halted early because the drug being tested was found to dramatically reduce the risk of relapse. The findings for the drug, letrozole, manufactured by Novartis and sold under the brand name Femara, electrified researchers and prompted them to abort the double-blind study of 5,187 postmenopausal women with early-stage disease and offer the treatment to the 2,594...

Fast Chat: 'You Don't Get That Excitement Anymore

Jack Nicklaus, who had a total hip replacement four years ago, is the spokesman for a new promotional campaign by Stryker Corp., the company that made his hip. He talked with NEWSWEEK's David Noonan and George Hackett about two topics of life-and-death importance: health and golf.How's that high-tech, ceramic hip of yours feeling?It's fine. If the rest of my body felt like my hip I'd be out training for the Olympics. Before I got it I really couldn't play golf because I couldn't walk. I...

High On Testosterone

Things weren't going well for Tristan Logan last winter, physically or mentally. The 55-year-old, an avid weight lifter with a black belt in tae kwon do, was tired and weak. The amount of iron he was able to pump during workouts was decreasing, after steadily increasing for years. Worse, the antidepressants he takes seemed to stop working, and his mood darkened. "I was going down the tubes," recalls Logan, of Nashua, N.H. Then, during a physical, his doctor checked Logan's testosterone level...

'Allowed To Be Odd'

Christopher John Francis Boone, the 15-year-old narrator of the new novel "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time," knows lots of stuff, including the capitals of all the countries in the world and every prime number up to 7,057. What he doesn't know, as the story begins, is who killed Wellington, his neighbor's poodle, with a garden fork (the book is set in England). Christopher's determination to solve this morbid little mystery is what drives the action of Mark Haddon's masterly...

You Want Statins With That?

You Know You Should Exercise, But You Also Know That Little Pill Will Let You Eat Rich Food And Still Keep Your Cholesterol Down. Now Scientists Think It Might Even Fight Alzheimer's

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