Corporate America Is Sick Of The Flu

Coming soon to desks and cubicles near you: wheezing, sneezing, germ-infested co-workers. Flu season is here, and corporate America is fighting back. More companies than ever are offering workers flu shots to offset the heavy toll the bug exacts each winter.

An Ingredient Under Fire

Where's the aspirin? Executives in the $18 billion over-the-counter drug industry developed a huge headache last week when a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel declared that an ingredient found in dozens of popular decongestants and diet drugs was unsafe.

An Ailing Profession

Anesthesiologist Julius Migliori remembers the 1960s fondly. His patients would enter the hospital as much as three days before surgery for elaborate pre-op work, then stick around afterward for a week or so of recovery.

Why Drugs Cost So Much

High Stakes: We Spend $125 Billion A Year On Drugs, And Prescription Costs Are A Hot Political Button. Staying Healthy, However, Isn't Cheap. The Real Story Behind The Sticker Shock.

Lighting Into Big Tobacco

Even the judge was startled. As he unfolded the verdict sheet and got his first look at the history-making $145 billion penalty handed down against the tobacco industry last week, Florida state court Judge Robert Kaye hesitated.

Are You Feeling Lucky?

Consumption has never been more conspicuous. With 11 pages of shoes you'd kill for! and a centerfold dedicated to "dreampuffs"—as in makeup sponges—Conde Nast's new Lucky magazine is a glossy paean to the art of shopping.

Turbulence Ahead

The industry that gave the world the jumbo jet has another big idea--the jumbo airline. United Airlines wants to buy US Airways in a $4.3 billion deal that would make it the largest carrier in the United States by far, with 500,000 passengers traveling on 6,500 flights a day.

Blackout Blunder

If it were a TV show, it might be called "No Winners." That's the likely outcome of the open corporate warfare between media superpowers Time Warner and Walt Disney.

The Real Drug War

Living in senior housing on $1,000 a month, plagued by arthritis and severe stomach problems, Viola Quirion has been forced to make some hard choices. "I had to skip my drugs and I had a lot of pain," says the 73-year-old resident of Waterville, Maine, who worked for 40 years in a shirt factory. "I tried to skip some meals, I bought the cheapest food I could." Quirion is a Medicare recipient with no prescription-drug coverage--the federal medical insurance program doesn't cover outpatient...

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