A Pro-Life Foreign Policy

At first glance, John Klink seemed like the perfect pick for the job. A veteran relief worker who'd helped impoverished refugees in Haiti, Thailand and Morocco, Klink surfaced earlier this year as George W. Bush's choice to head the State Department's influential Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. He'd spent years as a United Nations adviser to the Vatican. But despite Klink's credentials, word of his possible nomination caused an instant uproar. A devout Roman Catholic, he has...

'We Have To Sacrifice'

When Gina Garro and Brian Duplisea adopted 4-month-old Andres from Colombia last month, they were determined to take time off from work to care for him. Six years ago, after their daughter, Melina, was born, the family scraped by on Duplisea's $36,000 salary as a construction worker so Garro, a special-education teacher, could stay home. Now, since Garro's job furnishes the family health insurance, she'll head back to work this fall while Duplisea juggles diapers and baby bottles. His boss...

Periscope

As the storm over federal funding for embryonic-stem-cell research intensified last week, hope for an easy compromise faded. White House sources say it is unlikely that President Bush will announce his decision before he leaves for a meeting with Pope John Paul II in Europe next week. The delay could be part of a White House strategy to cast the decision as principled, not political. But doctors who met with the president last week told NEWSWEEK that Bush, who is known for his quick decision...

The Bone Collectors

No one knew the dangers better than Lt. Col. Rennie Cory Jr. An imposing Fort Bragg battalion commander with a classic "high and tight" haircut, he headed one unit of the Joint Task Force/Full Accounting Team, the U.S. government's ongoing search mission for the bodies of the 1,966 American soldiers still listed as missing from the Vietnam War. Stationed in Hanoi, Cory and his small crew of servicemen spent day and night scouring the countryside in search of decades-old battlefields and crash...

Drugs: Profits Vs. Pain Relief

They've watched an epidemic of painkiller abuse sweep through their rural towns. Now fed-up residents of Appalachia are striking back against what they see as the chief scourge--OxyContin, a powerful prescription drug designed to relieve debilitating pain ("Playing With Painkillers," NEWSWEEK, April 9). In Virginia, disgruntled OxyContin users and their relatives have filed a $5.2 billion class-action lawsuit against the drug's maker, Purdue Pharma, charging that the company failed to...

Million Moms March To A Merger

When they marched on the National Mall on Mother's Day 2000, the Million Moms seemed like a force to be reckoned with. Though they never quite numbered one million, the powerful grass-roots network of fed-up parents seemed poised to change the national debate on gun control. Just a year later, though, the Moms find themselves in a whole new world. Now, with an unsympathetic president in the White House and no money left in their coffers, the group is forging a new identity. On Thursday, the...

How One Town Got Hooked

No one could blame Joshua Coots for wanting to escape. Bored and frustrated, the pale, soft-spoken teen felt trapped in the tiny town of Hazard, Ky. The place didn't offer him many options. Left behind by the economic boom, the town of 5,500 still depends largely on the aging coal and timber industries. Empty storefronts dot the depressed Main Street. Highway strip malls are about the only places left to go for a night out. Coots couldn't imagine a lifetime hauling logs or toiling in the mines,...

Taking Aim At Abortion

The anniversary of Roe v. Wade has become a rite of passage for new presidents. Falling right after Inauguration Day, when the press, lawmakers and interest groups are scrutinizing every utterance from the incoming administration, it's an opportunity to send an explicit message about abortion rights. Bill Clinton used the Jan. 22 date eight years ago to reverse a Reagan-era ban on federal funding for overseas family-planning groups that offer abortion or abortion counseling. Last week, 28 years...

Letter from Air Force One: Clinton?s Farewell Trip

Bill Clinton didn???t look like a man with just three days left in his presidency. Heading to Little Rock for his last official trip aboard Air Force One on Wednesday morning, he still had work to do. ???You got anybody you want to pardon???? joked Clinton, appearing in the press cabin clutching a sheaf of papers. Earlier in the morning, he???d added another eight national monuments to the country???s roster. ???Everybody in America either wants somebody pardoned or a national monument,??? he...

A Place Of Their Own

When Judy Newdom and Val Filipski began planning their retirement, they worried about more than finding the perfect weather or a topnotch golf course. Devoted partners for 25 years, the two women had heard tales of retirement homes where same-sex couples weren't allowed to share an apartment, much less a bed. After finally adjusting to life as an openly gay couple, they feared they might not be welcomed by a traditional retirement community. So when Newdom heard about the Palms of Manasota, a...

An Irish Farewell

It's hard to blame Bill Clinton for getting a little misty-eyed. In small hamlets on the road from Dublin, hundreds of villagers turned out last week in the blustery chill to cheer and wave. When the president finally reached the border town of Dundalk, a crowd of 50,000 packed the central square as American and Irish flags billowed in the wind. "A large part of my heart will always be in Ireland for all the days of my life," Clinton said. When the crowd sang a melancholy rendition of "Danny...

Hillary's Whole New Book

Hillary Clinton was in her element. On stage at Belfast's ornate Grand Opera House last week, flanked by volunteers and politicians' wives, Clinton celebrated the role of women in the Northern Ireland peace process. In a confident speech reminiscent of another Clinton, she urged her audience to keep pushing for a common-sense end to the ages-old conflict. On her last official overseas trip as First Lady--"a heartfelt and bittersweet time," she said--Clinton fondly recalled not only earlier...

Old Foes, New Fans

On Nov. 8, 1967, U.S. air force Capt. Lawrence Evert was flying his F-105D Thunderchief bomber fast and low over a paddy field near the Vietnamese village of Tien Chau. As the 29-year-old Wyoming native approached his target, a railroad bridge 17 miles outside Hanoi, the plane was blasted by antiaircraft fire. "I'm hit hard!" Evert shouted in his final radio transmission before apparently crashing in a field. Last Saturday, almost exactly 33 years later, an American president and the pilot's...

Reporters Notebook: Leaving The War Behind

I will admit it up front: I don't remember the Vietnam War. I was born in 1966, just as President Lyndon Johnson was stepping up shipments of young Americans to a tropical place halfway around the world.When the last helicopters swung away from the roof of the American embassy in Saigon in 1975, I was just 8 years old. I don't remember grisly images from the evening news or anti-war protests or rising body counts. But growing up in the wake of the baby boomers--a generation that seemed to...

Hillary Goes Up The Hill

The honeymoon was over before it began. For years, ever since her health-care plan took a nose dive, Hillary Rodham Clinton has tried to rebuild her relations on Capitol Hill, toiling behind the scenes as she discreetly collaborated with members of both parties to push legislation on bankruptcy reform, foster care and adoption. But last week the First Lady learned firsthand that the Senate may be more of a street fight than a policy seminar. "I tell you one thing," said Republican Majority...

State Of The 'Union'

After 17 years together, Patricia Peard and Alice Brock didn't think they needed a ceremony to prove their love. But when they heard last summer that Vermont had just become the first state in the country to grant gays and lesbians marriagelike "civil unions," the two couldn't resist the lure of making their bond official. Peard and Brock planned a pilgrimage from their Maine home. Steering their station wagon along Vermont's winding roads one August afternoon, the two chatted excitedly. Just...

Periscope

After their first face-off in the New York Senate race last week, Hillary Clinton and Rick Lazio left the stage without shaking hands. Lazio hugged his wife, then dashed to the press room to schmooze with reporters. The First Lady posed for photos with moderator Tim Russert, then ducked backstage to take a call from her husband, who had watched the debate at the White House via satellite. Both camps quickly declared victory. Hillary's spinmeisters said she was "composed and charismatic" under...

Report From Philly: Swing Voters Swung,

They call them swing voters for a reason. Thursday night proved why. After watching Gov. George W. Bush deliver his acceptance speech in Philadelphia, 35 out of 36 swing voters said they had a more favorable impression of the GOP nominee. Seven who'd begun the week leaning toward Gore actually swung their votes to Bush. The voters, all undecided at the start of the convention last Sunday, took part in nightly focus group sessions, sponsored by MSNBC and yrock.com. Though the group was too small...

Changing Minds

Lots of Americans tuned into the Democratic convention in Los Angeles last week, but few were paying closer attention than a group of Philadelphia swing voters. Several weeks ago, the 36 voters scrutinized each night of the Republican convention as part of a focus group sponsored by MSNBC and yrock.com. This week, NEWSWEEK talked with some of those same voters to see whether they'd watched the Democratic show--and whether it had changed their opinions.Before both conventions, all three-dozen...

Report From Philly: Checking In With Our Focus Group

While most Americans tuned into the latest episode of "Survivor" or the Minnesota-Baltimore baseball game on Wednesday night, 36 volunteers gamely gathered at a Philadelphia Holiday Inn to watch the latest installment of another drama: the Republican convention. They are undecided voters, the holy grail of this election season. But winning them over won't be easy: they're a decidedly grumpy lot. They don't like negative attacks. They don't like saccharin sweet tributes. (Who cares if Dick...

Al's Family Matters

Last summer Vice President Al Gore asked his brother-in-law, Frank Hunger, to look at the finances of his troubled presidential campaign. Hunger didn't like what he saw. Spending was on a pace that would leave Gore penniless before the end of the primary season. The campaign's K Street headquarters was flabby with pricey consultants, some splitting their time between Gore and other clients. A soft-spoken former Mississippi trial lawyer with a thatch of white hair, Hunger was married for 18...

Al's Florida Spring Break With Clinton

Florida is an alluring spot on Al Gore's 2000 political map. Only Texas, New York and California offer a bigger November payoff than its 25 electoral votes. Bill Clinton broke a longtime Republican lock on the state in 1996, and polls show Gore within striking distance or slightly ahead of George W. Bush. At the very least, Goreheads hope that a big push in Florida will force W to spend more time and money than he wants to in a place where brother Jeb is the governor. That was clearly part of...

Chelsea's New Morning

When she first visited the Taj Mahal with her mother five years ago, Chelsea Clinton was a shy 15-year-old struggling with her celebrity as First Daughter. The Clintons, determined to preserve her privacy, placed her nearly every move and utterance strictly off limits to reporters. The traveling press had to fight for permission to quote her musing innocently that she'd once dreamed of herself as a princess in the 17th-century landmark. Last week the poised and blossoming 20-year-old, on spring...

Inside Hillary's D.C. Game

Rarely able to sleep in, Hillary Clinton got up early one February morning in 1995 and glanced at stories on the front page of The Washington Post. Nothing too exciting: a federal crackdown on telemarketers, a marathon swimmer setting a record. Then a headline caught Hillary's eye. The Defense Department was attempting to slash $150 million for breast-cancer research that had been tucked into the Pentagon budget. The First Lady was furious. For years she'd worked to raise awareness about the...

'I'm Going To Miss This Place'

Jetting to Los Angeles for a weekend of speeches and fund-raisers last Friday, Bill Clinton turned philosophical. The president and his close friend Bruce Lindsey were chatting aboard Air Force One when Clinton began reminiscing about all the famous people he'd met in his White House years. "One of the great things about being president is that nearly anybody will come to talk to you--once, anyway," he later joked to an audience. Even now Clinton maintains a bustling social schedule. Earlier in...

What Bill Can Do For Al

Late last year Bill Clinton was kicking back with a group of high-powered African-Americans in the Washington living room of Ernie Green, the president's old pal from Arkansas and one of the Little Rock Nine who integrated Central High School in 1957. Over canapes and coffee, the group heaped praise on Clinton. When talk turned to the 2000 race, the mood cooled. Everyone pledged to support Vice President Al Gore, but several wondered aloud whether black voters would embrace him as eagerly as...

Hillary Makes Her Move

Her Senate campaign hadn't even formally begun, and already it was rumored to be in trouble. Hillary Clinton's poll numbers were dropping, her Washington-based advisers were under fire from local pols and--worst of all--fund-raising was said to be slowing. Her latest troubles began with The Kiss: the diplomatically correct, but politically disastrous, embrace of Palestinian First Lady Suha Arafat, who had charged Israelis with poisoning Arab children. Seemingly shaken by the response in New...

Victory Or Sellout?

Madeleine Albright seemed like a good foil. She's a woman--the first ever to be U.S. secretary of State. And she's pro-choice on abortion. Surely, feminists and family-planning activists would listen when she explained the Faustian trade-offs necessary to make policy in Washington. They might understand, in particular, that in order to get Republican agreement to pay massive U.S. arrears at the United Nations--and preserve American influence abroad--the Clinton administration would have to...

More Than Just A Kiss

A meeting with the wife of the leader of the Palestinian Authority is not normally on the tour of the "Three I's"--Ireland, Italy, and Israel--traditionally required of candidates courting the ethnic vote in New York. But if the candidate is also the First Lady, duty calls. Last week Hillary Clinton sat impassively at a West Bank ceremony while Suha Arafat accused Israel of poisoning Palestinian women and children in the occupied territories. She offered Mrs. Arafat the traditional peck on both...

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