Fareed Zakaria

The Next Step? Think Vietnam.

If you want to understand the futility of america's current situation in Iraq, last week provided a vivid microcosm. On Thursday, just hours before a series of car bombs killed more than 200 people in the Shia stronghold of Sadr City, Sunni militants attacked the Ministry of Health, which is run by one of Moqtada al-Sadr's followers.

Unwanted Offspring

Imagine that it is January 2000, and you are asked to look into a crystal ball and predict the course of the global economy over the next six years. The misty glass gives you some hints: the coming stock-market collapse, followed by suicide airliner attacks on the Twin Towers and two protracted wars, all leading to a quadrupling in the price of oil.

The Forgotten Battleground

President Bush flew halfway around the globe last week, but in a sense he visited another world. Bush is preoccupied almost entirely by Iraq, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, North Korea and, if he has time enough in a day, by Venezuela and Russia.

Time to Solve Immigration

If Iraq was the dominating topic of the election season in the United States, immigration is the issue that wasn't. Despite the efforts of populist and nativist politicians and pundits to whip up hysteria about a looming catastrophe, Americans didn't bite.

Rethinking Iraq: The Way Forward

The drawdown option: It is past time to confront reality. To avoid total defeat, we must reduce and redeploy our troops and nudge the Iraqis toward a deal. Here's how.

Let Them Eat Carrots

Despite all the disagreement over who's to blame for the North Korean nuclear test, everyone agrees on the next step: economic sanctions. But does anyone really think that they will work?

Iraq's Dark Day Of Reckoning

When Iraq's current government was formed last April, after four months of bitter disputes, wrangling and paralysis, many voices in America and in Iraq said the next six months would be the crucial testing period.

Food: Vegas For Gourmets

In the past decade, Las Vegas has been flooded with brand-name chefs. But few of their restaurants have become destinations in their own right. Now that's changing.

Interview: 'I Know the Problem'

Afghan President Hamid Karzai spoke with NEWSWEEK's Fareed Zakaria at a meeting of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York last week. Excerpts:KARZAI: There is no political strength for the Taliban in Afghanistan.

What Iranians Least Expect

If you think Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has said some crazy things, none comes close to this: "If the worst came to worst and half of mankind died, the other half would remain while imperialism would be razed to the ground ... " That was Mao Zedong in 1957.

Questions For The Interrogators

A fierce debate over military tribunals has erupted in Washington. This is great news. The American constitutional system is finally working. The idea that the war on terror should be fought unilaterally by the executive branch--a theory the Bush administration promulgated for its entire first term--has died.

Mao & Stalin, Osama & Saddam

I'm glad George W. Bush is using the bully pulpit to clarify the war on terror. Many of Bush's basic ideas--such as the need for reform in the Arab world--are sensible; it's their simplistic and botched execution, coupled with a mindless unilateralism, that have derailed his foreign policy.

The Year of Living Fearfully

It's 1938, says the liberal columnist Richard Cohen, evoking images of Hitler's armies massing in the face of an appeasing West. No, no, says Newt Gingrich, the Third World War has already begun.

Why We Don't Get No Respect

The Bush administration must wonder these days if it has a Rodney Dangerfield problem. No matter what it does, it can't seem to get any respect. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has engineered a broad shift in American diplomacy over the last year, moving policy toward greater multilateralism, cooperation and common sense on Iran, North Korea and Iraq, and several other issues.And yet it hasn't produced a change in attitudes toward the United States.

How To Exploit The Opening

You've read all the cautions. This is not a turning point. Zarqawi's death is not a seismic event. He was not that brilliant or strategic. He will be replaced.

How Long Will America Lead the World?

Queen victoria's diamond Jubilee, held in London on June 22, 1897, was one of the grandest fetes the world has ever seen: 46,000 troops and 11 colonial prime ministers arrived from the four corners of the earth to pay homage to their sovereign.

What We Need To Get Right

I'm glad that the president has finally admitted to some mistakes in Iraq. But what worries me is that he still seems to be persisting in one important error.

What the World Really Wants

The Bush administration describes spreading democracy as the lodestar of its foreign policy. It speaks about democracy constantly and has expanded funding for programs associated with it.

The Real Story Of Pricey Oil

I don't know if the world is running out of oil, a subject of heated debate. Even oil experts really are just guessing. But what's clear is that supply is low because few producers are spending big chunks of money to find and develop new oilfields.

Adrift in a Turbulent World

The most important strategic decision the United States will make in the next decade is not about Iraq, Iran or North Korea. It is about China. What will America's basic attitude be toward the rise of China?

A Nuclear Reality Check

Many of the Bush administration's critics argue, with some merit, that it has often pursued a foreign policy based on ideology and fantasy, not the realities of the world.

To Become an American

Seven years ago, when I was visiting Germany, I met with an official who explained to me that the country had a fool-proof solution to its economic woes. Watching the U.S. economy soar during the'90s, the Germans had decided that they, too, needed to go the high-technology route.

Appalling--But Not Hopeless

Three years ago this week, I watched the invasion of Iraq apprehensively. I had supported military intervention to rid the country of Saddam's tyranny, but I had also been appalled by the crude and unilateral manner in which the Bush administration handled the issue.

How to Stop A Genocide

There is a glimmer of hope for Darfur, where in the past two years 300,000 people have been killed and 2 million displaced in a genocidal war that has been encouraged and funded by Sudan's government.

Separating Fact From Fantasy

Watching what's happening in Iraq right now, with Shias and Sunnis polarized, hostile and increasingly violent, it is easy to conclude that this is all a product of ancient hatreds and that Iraq will inevitably descend into a bloody civil war.

India Rising

Messy, raucous, democratic India is growing fast, and now may partner up with the world's richest democracy--America.

Nixon to China, Bush to India

There has been remarkably little discussion in the United States of what is perhaps the major strategic initiative of the Bush second term. The administration is pursuing an objective, which, if successful, could bear some similarities to Nixon's opening to China in 1973: a proposed nuclear agreement with India.

The Decline and Fall of Europe

Cartoons and riots made the headlines in Europe last week, but a far less fiery event, the publication of an academic study, might shed greater light on the future of the Continent.

Islam and Power

George W. Bush is not a man for second thoughts, but even he might have had some recently. Ever since 9/11, Bush has made the promotion of democracy in the Middle East the center-piece of his foreign policy, and doggedly pushed the issue.

Caught by Surprise. Again.

In the late 1970s, American officials were aware that the Shah of Iran was losing domestic support. They analyzed alternate scenarios and studied various opposition groups.

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