Fareed Zakaria

RACHID MOHAMED RACHID

As Egyptian minister of trade and industry, former businessman Rachid Mohamed Rachid has his work cut out for him. Many Middle East experts believe the entire project of democratizing the region boils down to Egypt, which has historically been the leader of the Arab world.

HOW WE DRIVE OUR JOBS AWAY

Which part of North America makes the most cars? If you answered Michigan, you would have been right for 100 years. But you would not be right anymore. Last year the Canadian province of Ontario surpassed Michigan in car production.

THE EDUCATION OF PAUL WOLFOWITZ

Paul Wolfowitz's appointment might be a very good thing for the World Bank, but for a reason exactly the opposite to the one his supporters believe. The deputy Defense secretary's champions are certain that he will take over the bank and give it a thorough overhaul.

A SAFE HAVEN'S RISKS

The economics of the dollar make perfect sense. As other countries--notably in Asia--grow in wealth, they need to put their money somewhere. U.S. Treasuries are the obvious choice.

What Bush Got Right

Freedom's March: The President Has Been Right On Some Big Questions. Now, If He Can Get The Little Stuff Right, He'll Change The World.

IMAGINE: 500 MILES PER GALLON

The most important statement made last week came not from Vladimir Putin or George W. Bush but from Ali Naimi, Saudi Arabia's shrewd oil minister. Naimi predicted that crude prices would stay between $40 and $50 throughout 2005.

STANDING UP FOR PEOPLE POWER

The last time I saw Rafik Hariri, he stood up to Syria. It was two months ago in Dubai at the Arab Strategy Forum. One of my duties there was to chair a session with Hariri, the former prime minister of Lebanon.

DON'T JUST RUSH TO THE EXITS

On the night after the Iraqi elections, I was a guest on "The Daily Show." The host, Jon Stewart, began the discussion on the previous day's events by saying, "We did it!

HAIL TO THE FLIP-FLOPPER

Last week's elections were a great day for Iraq, for the Middle East, for America and for one American in particular. George W. Bush rightly deserves credit for these elections and what they symbolize.

ELECTIONS ARE NOT DEMOCRACY

By the time you read this, you will know how the elections in Iraq have gone. No matter what the violence, the elections are an important step forward, for Iraq and for the Middle East.

HIGH HOPES, HARD FACTS

It was a speech written for the ages, and it will live in history as a powerful affirmation of American ideas and ideals. George W. Bush's second Inaugural Address was the culmination, in style and substance, of a position he has been veering toward ever since September 11, 2001: that the purpose of American foreign policy must be the expansion of liberty.

LISTEN TO THE AYATOLLAH

Last Wednesday, Mahmoud Madaen was killed while walking home with his son after his evening prayers in the town of Salman Pak, south of Baghdad. In a Web posting, the group that claimed responsibility made clear that it had murdered Madaen because he was the local representative of Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani (the most respected Shia leader in Iraq).

AMID DISASTER, NEW CONFIDENCE

To understand how much and how fast India is changing, look at its response to the tsunami. I don't mean the government's reaction but that of individual Indians.

HOPE AMID THE RUINS

In poor countries, natural disasters are not earth-shattering news. It's not that people there don't value life deeply. But they have accustomed themselves to tragedy, and to facing tragedy with limited media attention, cash-strapped governments, few local charities and almost no insurance.

GOOD NEWS FROM THE ARAB WORLD

Since September 11, 2001, I've written a column once a year pointing out the good news, which is that Islamic extremism is losing. The movement, in all of its variations, has been unable to garner mass support in any Muslim country.

'WHO THE DEVIL REALLY WAS'

I arrived in London the day after Hamid Karzai's inauguration as Afghanistan's newly elected president. Britain's most serious left-of-center newspaper, The Guardian, reported on the event in detail, noting that after decades of war, coups and bloodshed, this was a historic day.

WHEN THE U.N. FAILS, WE ALL DO

You have never heard of Paul Rusesabagina. But if you watch the stunning new movie "Hotel Rwanda," you will never forget him. The movie tells the true story of Rusesabagina, an "ordinary" Rwandan, a hotel manager, who was able to shelter and save more than 1,200 people--Tutsis and Hutus--in the midst of the Rwandan genocide.

TAG-TEAMING THE MULLAHS

Anyone who tells you that he has a clear solution to the problem posed by Iran's nuclear ambitions is not being honest. It's about as tough as foreign-policy problems get.

REJECTING THE NEXT BILL GATES

As Condoleezza Rice enters the State Department, she will face a number of pressing foreign-policy problems that she cannot solve. This will not be for lack of effort or intelligence on her part.

HEARTS, MINDS AND FALLUJAH

Fallujah is likely to be a turning point of the war in Iraq, one way or the other. Either it will mark a decisive blow against the insurgency, setting the stage for similar operations in other cities and thus allowing for elections in January.

WRITING PROSE FOR A NEW TERM

The key to President Bush's victory might lie in a simple historical fact. No American president has lost an election in the midst of a war. Two of them, Truman and Johnson, decided not to run as the country was slogging through Korea and Vietnam, after tens of thousands of American casualties.But no incumbent president who has put himself up for re-election during a war has lost.

TV, MONEY AND 'CROSSFIRE' POLITICS

There are no unscripted moments in American politics anymore, certainly not seven days before the presidential election. That's why the talk of Washington last week was a few minutes of spontaneous unrehearsed drama--among TV personalities, not politicians.

WHAT BUSH AND KERRY MISSED

The presidential debates are lauded for having been substantive and revealing. In particular, people have noted how rare it is to have a serious discussion about foreign policy these days.

HOW TO WIN THE 'NETWAR' IN IRAQ

If you are looking for good news out of Iraq, there are glimmers. Last week U.S. troops accompanied by Iraqi forces regained control of Samarra in a relatively quick and clean operation.

AMERICANS EAT CHEESE, TOO

The Bush campaign believes it has found one soft spot in John Kerry's debate performance. In the days after the contest, the president has relentlessly hit one theme: that Kerry is a wimpy multilateralist. "I've been to a lot of summits," Bush said derisively at a rally in Pennsylvania last Friday. "I've never seen a meeting that would depose a tyrant, or bring a terrorist to justice...

HOW TO PICK A WAR PRESIDENT

Forty-four years ago, on Sept. 26, 1960, the first presidential debate in American history was held in Chicago. Between 60 million and 70 million Americans watched Richard Nixon and John F.

How Not To Win Muslim Allies

There Are Many In Europe Who Want To Keep Turkey Out Of The Eu Because It Is Large, Poor And, Most Important, Because It Is Muslim

A Vision, And Little Else

President Bush Mocked Press Reports, But If He Really Thinks That Iraq Today Looks Like Germany In 1946, He's In For A Rude Surprise

WHY KERRY IS RIGHT ON IRAQ

John Kerry isn't being entirely honest about his views on Iraq. But neither is President George W. Bush. "Knowing what we know now," Bush asked, "would [Kerry] have supported going into Iraq?" The real answer is, of course, "no." But that's just as true for Bush as for Kerry.

THE STEALTH NUCLEAR THREAT

Who could have imagined that alliance management would be a hot election issue in America? But it is. John Kerry's repeated pledge to restore relations with America's allies has struck a chord.

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