Geoffrey Cowley

A Tale of Two Indias

Thirty-five-year-old Rama Devi is not exactly an icon of good fortune. She and her five children live in a dusty, thatched-hut village called Kashiou, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

The Deadliest Cancer

Lung cancer kills more Americans than any other type of malignancy—and some of the victims never smoked. But despite grim statistics there is some good news: fresh research offers hope for earlier diagnosis and more-effective treatments.

BLAISE JUDJA-SATO

Five years ago, Blaise Judja-Sato was living a rural African's dream. Born poor in Cameroon, he had worked his way into elite schools and become a prosperous American.

TARGETING TUMORS

Learning you have breast cancer is bad enough, but the diagnosis is doubly devastating for the 20 to 30 percent of patients who turn out to be "HER-2-positive." Tumors carrying that designation grow with unusual speed, and are more likely to recur after treatment. "Hearing you have HER-2," says Darlene Nipper, 40, "is like hearing a death sentence."Not anymore.

Family Matters

WE DON'T GET SICK OR STAY WELL BY OURSELVES. THE PEOPLE CLOSEST TO US AFFECT EVERY ASPECT OF OUR HEALTH--AND OUR OWN WELL-BEING AFFECTS THEIRS.

The Flu Shot Fiasco

THE SHORTAGE HAS PUT MILLIONS INTO A PANIC. SPOTTY SUPPLY IS THE IMMEDIATE PROBLEM. CARING FOR OUR COUNTRY'S PUBLIC HEALTH IS THE BIGGER ISSUE.

BRAIN CHECK

Imagine you're allergic to the oil of the Japanese lacquer tree--so allergic that the brush of a leaf against your skin provokes an angry rash. Strapping a blindfold over your eyes, a scientist tells you she's going to rub your right arm with lacquer leaf and your left arm with the innocuous leaf of a chestnut tree.

Brain Check

SCIENTISTS ARE MAPPING THE PATHWAYS THAT LINK EMOTION TO HEALTH. THE CHALLENGE FOR THE REST OF US IS TO PUT THE DISCOVERIES TO WORK.

Medicine Without Doctors

In Africa, just 2 percent of people with AIDS get the treatment they need. But drugs are cheap, access to them is improving and a new grass-roots effort gives reason to hope

Girls, Boys And Autism

Is This Mysterious And Sometimes Devastating Condition Just An Extreme Version Of Normal Male Intelligence? That's One Provocative New Theory. Behind Autism's Gender Gap.

Beware Of Those Legal Drugs

Four decades after Timothy Leary implored a generation to "turn on," getting high remains a common college pastime. Only the methods have changed. Many of today's most widely abused drugs are perfectly legal--at least when prescribed by doctors.

Our Bodies, Our Fears

Anna-li Yaron will never forget the first time she heard the bomb siren go off. It happened in early February while she was sitting in class at Charles Smith High School for the Arts in Jerusalem.

Our Bodies, Our Fears

As They Reach For The Duct Tape, Americans Say They're More Anxious Than Ever. Scientific Research About How Our Brains And Bodies Process Fear Can Teach Us How To Live With Long-Term Stress.

A Better Way To Eat

Americans Have Grown Fatter And Sicker Since The Usda Food Pyramid Came Out A Decade Ago. Is There A Healthier, Tastier Diet?

Confronting Smallpox

The defeat of the deadly smallpox virus still stands as one of modern science's most stunning achievements. The wretched disease engulfs the body in pustules that itch and ooze and often blind or disfigure victims who survive.

Now,'Integrative' Care

As Science Rigorously Examines Herbs And Acupuncture, A New Blend Of Medicine Emerges

In The News: A Quick Hiv Test

Learning that you're HIV-positive may seem an awful fate, but not learning can be worse. People with undetected HIV not only miss out on early treatment but risk spreading the virus unwittingly.

Certified Organic

Stamp Of Approval: New Government Rules Will Define 'Organic.' The Sale Of These Fruits, Veggies And Snack Foods Has Soared, But We Still Aren't Sure What Good They Do. Here's A Guide To How Purer Products Affect The Health Of Our Families And The Planet.

The End Of The Age Of Estrogen

Women Were Told For Decades That Hormone-Replacement Therapy Would Protect Their Hearts And Preserve Their Youth. Now The Evidence Is In, And An Era Is Over.

Sowing Seeds Of Redemption

Eileen Kiniery had just stepped off a New Jersey commuter train on September 11 when the first of two jets hit the World Trade Center. She is still haunted by the faces she saw pressed against the tower windows over the next hour, the stray limbs and torsos in the street, but she is equally awed by the communion she experienced.

How Little We Really Know

What a difference a month makes. When a tabloid photo editor died of pulmonary anthrax in early October, not even the tabloids conjured a terrorist plot. And when it turned out there was a terrorist plot, experts assumed that the risk to most people was minimal.

New Heart, New Hope

Does This Tangled Knot Of Titanium And Plastic Represent The Future Of Cardiac Medicine?

Can He Find A Cure?

There was a time in the early '80s when AIDS was killing people with brutal efficiency, and no one knew what caused it. Was it swine-flu virus? The inhalants that gay men were using to heighten sexual pleasure?

The Search For A Vaccine

NEWSWEEK: How did the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative get started?Seth Berkley: The conceptual work for IAVI began in 1993-94, when I was still at the Rockefeller Foundation.

Heartsick America

We've just had our heart checked, and the news isn't good. According to a federal report released last week, some 36 million Americans should now be taking drugs to lower their cholesterol.

The New Animal Farm

If you had to pick the likely stroke victim from a lineup, Amanda Davis is not the person you'd choose. On the eve of her 20th birthday, the sweet-faced New Englander was driving home from college to visit her parents when she started feeling queasy and uncoordinated.

New Ways To Stay Clean

When Colin Martinez turned 43 a couple of years ago he was living under a bridge in Denver. By his count, he had devoted 31 years to getting wasted. "I smoked crack or freebased for 16 years," he says. "I injected heroin, injected cocaine, snorted cocaine and heroin, popped pills, smoked opium, smoked pot and hashish.

Going Super Slow

For 10 years Dr. Philip Alexander ran 60 miles a week--and on days when he didn't run he would put in time on his bike. Then, five years ago, he really got serious about physical fitness.

Pages