Jeffrey Bartholet

'Nobody Is Safe'

The Indian soldier, in full battle gear and armed with an AK-47, seems only mildly embarrassed. He's herding a dozen men and women down a narrow road in Indian-ruled Kashmir. "Nobody has voted, so we've got an order to collect them," the soldier explains. "We have to show that people have voted." He says he's only following orders.

The Fear Factor

Nobody has voted, so we've got an order to collect them," the Indian soldier explains. Nearby, seven Kashmiri men, eyes hard with what could be anger or fear, are squatting by the side of a narrow road that winds up a ridge in Indian-ruled Kashmir.

Method To The Madness

In this age of celebrity, Osama bin Laden knows the importance of stagecraft. He cultivates an air of mystery, and has a knack for tapping feelings of alienation and anger.

Rising Above The Ruins

The gorges of Ghorband form a natural fortress. To get to the dugouts along the front lines, you take a road that snakes around towering crags, above a river valley of astonishing beauty.

Inside The Mullah's Mind

The only known photo of Mullah Mohammed Omar, the leader of the Islamic Taliban militia and self-styled "supreme leader of the Muslim faithful," is grainy, out of focus and more than five years old.

The Mesmerizer

Osama bin Laden likes to pose with an AK-47, yet he seems a bit awkward with a gun. He's a thin reed of a man--roughly 6 feet 5 and just 160 pounds, according to FBI Wanted posters--soft-spoken, languid in his movements, almost effeminate.

Bolting From Baghdad

One upside of having Saddam Hussein for an enemy is that even his own representatives are scared of him and prone to defect. The downside is that once they do bolt from Baghdad, they often have very little intelligence to convey.Dictators like Saddam survive by making sure that nobody knows much, and that's particularly true for diplomats: The very nature of their jobs, living and working among foreigners, makes them suspect.

Unhappy Endings

It's a beautiful morning to nab a $1.5 million motor yacht. The predawn mercury is topping 70 degrees, there's a balmy breeze and we're speeding along in an inflatable, hard-bottomed tow boat toward a marina in North Palm Beach, Fla.

A Big Man In Africa

Enter the offices of an African big man and have a look around. The first security guard you meet is a wiry fellow with suspicious eyes and a shirt collar so frayed that you have to wonder what's been chewing on it.

All-Nighters In New York

A bystander might have thought some ghastly catastrophe had struck the earth. In the predawn gloom near New York's East River, diplomats from around the globe were sleeping on the floor or splayed out in chairs around a basement conference room.

From Olive Oil To Sniper Fire

Beit Jala, an ancient jumble of Palestinian homes on a hill opposite Bethlehem, used to be a quiet place. When my wife and I lived there in 1993 and 1994, Israeli forces dominated the town from an outpost on top of the hill.

Peace On The Ground

When a convoy of U.S. diplomats drove through Srebrenica last week, nobody along the road cheered the peacemakers. One man held up a three-fingered Serb victory sign.

The Sounds Of Silence

Every dying language had an adventurous youth. Eyak can be traced to an ancient mother tongue that was centered near the Yukon and Tanana rivers in North America.

Retreat, Regret, Relief

The calculus of Israel's troubled history in Lebanon seems, at first glance, simple enough. Add up the invasions, "operations," commando raids, kidnappings and massacres by proxy armies.

Fury And Fear

The abandoned foundry complex in central Freetown now thrums with an energy both malignant and benign. Thousands of jittery people are camped under a huge corrugated steel shed, among enormous lathes and metal presses that haven't worked in at least two years.

The Thin Blue Line

Foday Sankoh is a jolly, self-adoring thug whose fighters used to chop the limbs off children. Last week they picked an ostensibly tougher target: peacekeepers of the United Nations.

Hunger In The Horn

Badia Omar, whose gleaming white teeth seem almost too pretty for her emaciated body, doesn't know whether her husband is still alive. For months they wandered together across the parched lowlands of Ethiopia, and watched as thirst and hunger claimed their 200 sheep, 25 cows and one goat.

The Lost Billions

The death of Gen. Sani Abacha was, by any standard, a sordid affair. As president of Nigeria, the oil-rich country that dominates West Africa, Abacha could satisfy his every desire.

Grandma Diplomacy

Looking as if they'd like to knock a few people on the head with their handbags, two Cuban grandmothers flew into the middle of an American political brawl last week.

The Plague Years

As The New Century Begins, Aids Tightens Its Medieval Death Grip On Africa. The Anatomy Of An Epidemic--And Its Rising Human Toll.

Fields Of Gold

Zuber has a gaze that's a little too steady. Taken together with his bushy black beard, shaved head and tan shalwar kamiz--the pajama-like clothes that Afghan men wear--the effect is unsettling.

The Holy Men Of Heroin

Zuber has a gaze that's a little too steady. Taken together with his bushy black beard, shaved head and tan shalwar kamiz--the pajamalike clothes that Afghan men wear--the effect is unsettling.

A Return To Somalia

Our plane to Mogadishu is a Soviet-made Ilyushin-18, built in the Khrushchev era. The exhaust funnels are charred black, the tires bald. A Russian in blue overalls paces the aisle with an extra-long screwdriver and a lit cigarette as Somali passengers complain--in short, sharp blasts of invective--about the heat.

Marching Into A Trap?

Eurico Guterres is not a very imposing enemy. On one level, he's just a two-bit thug, a former gang boss who allegedly controlled prostitution and gambling rackets in East Timor.

A Superpower's Dilemma

The three women entered the United Nations office in East Timor and softly appealed to an American volunteer, Pamela Sexton. Could she help them with an injured man?

Terror In The Streets

The three women entered the United Nations office in East Timor and softly appealed to an American volunteer, Pamela Sexton. Could she help them with an injured man?

Driving Out The Serbs

Father Sava Janjic is that rare breed, the righteous Serb. He consistently opposed Serb attacks in Kosovo, condemned the atrocities and continues to call for the ouster of Yugoslav strongman Slobodan Milosevic.

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