' Hacked E-mails 'Indicate Poor Judgement'

Earlier this week we published an interview Sharon Begley conducted with noted climate-change scientist James Hansen about his new book, Storms of My Grandchildren; the upcoming climate-change summit in Copenhagen; and the challenges presented to our ecosystem in the face of mounting evidence about the dangers of CO2 emissions. The interview, however, was conducted last week—well before news of the hacked climate-change e-mails was made public. Those e-mails, from some leading voices on...

The Takeaway From 'The Takeaway': Five Easy Subject Changes to Avoid Thanksgiving Fights

Today on Public Radio International's morning show, The Takeaway, host John Hockenberry, Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley, and I discussed how to avoid family fights during Thanksgiving. As I mentioned on the show, some amount of discord may be inevitable this year: from health care to climate change to gay rights, we're living in a particularly political time.Like in War Games, the only way to win a political argument amongst relatives is not to play. But while you can...

The Real Problem With Mammograms: They're Too Good at Finding Things We Don't Understand

This week, the United States Preventive Services Task Force revised their guidelines for breast cancer screening based on a comprehensive review of evidence published in the most recent issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. Previously, women over 40 were encouraged to schedule a mammogram every year. Now, USPSTF says that women can wait until 50. Though other groups, like Susan G. Komen for the Cure  and the American Cancer Society have not changed their recommendations, it's the...

Swine Flu: When to Head to the Hospital, When to Stay Home

Have a fever, a sore throat, and flulike symptoms? It could be H1N1, as 46 states now report widespread H1N1 infection, and the president has declared the virus a national emergency. And now, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has released a study showing that of those who are hospitalized for H1N1, 30 percent require intensive care, and 10 percent die─and that the flu kills people in all age groups. Scary stuff, enough to make one run to the doctor at the slightest runny...

In Memory of Michael Goldsmith Baseball Fan

Michael Goldsmith, the baseball fan who penned the NEWSWEEK My Turn column that became a game-changer for major league baseball, died this week at the age of 58. Goldsmith suffered from and finally succumbed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, the degenerative condition robbed the Hall of Famer of his life and robs 30,000 Americans at any given time of their ability to walk, speak, and eventually breathe. It's a rare disease—striking two out of...

Bloggers Respond to Allison Samuels's Essay on Zahara Jolie-Pitt

During Good Hair Week, a series of blog articles devoted to issues of hair, culture, politics, and science, we asked writer Allison Samuels to contribute a guest blog posting. Her piece, which called on the Jolie-Pitt household to take better care of adopted daughter Zahara's hair, touched on the politics of interracial adoption, the role of beauty standards by which our children (and we) are judged, despite all our lip service toward the contrary, and the power of hair to guide our sense...

Sex Is Not the Problem: What David Letterman and Steve Phillips Demonstrate About Women in the Workplace

The recent revelation of a summertime affair gone wrong between ESPN's Baseball Tonight analyst Steve Phillips and a 22-year-old production assistant seemed like just another postscript of a year plagued by sex scandals.  Now it's been reported that Phillips has been fired for his office affair. "His ability to be an effective representative for ESPN has been significantly and irreparably damaged," said a spokesman for the network.  Phillips is apparently set to enter a "treatment...

Jake Tapper, Chuck Todd, and Shershah Syed: What You Can Do To Help Women In Pakistan

Who was the biggest loser after last night's decisive Game 5 of the National League Championship Series?  Not the Dodgers, who had to fly back to L.A. after losing the series to the 2008 world champion Philadelphia Phillies. Not even that guy who celebrated too much and fell off the roof of a taxi. The real loser is Chuck Todd, the Dodgers fan and NBC political correspondent who made a side bet with Philadelphia loyalist/ABC chief White House correspondent Jake Tapper. But while Todd and...

The Balloon Boy Fallout: Greed, Not Reality TV, May Have Deflated the Heene Family

We're midway through day five of Balloongate, with reports that the Heene family, who allegedly tricked most of America into watching a Mylar balloon for two hours during the middle of a work day, may face felony and misdemeanor charges sometime next week. The official count will have to do with wasting public resources, but to many people, the larger crime is that the Heenes were allegedly using their children as bait for a potential reality show. As CNN.com notes, there's been little...

Tonight: Kate Dailey on 'The Agenda With Steve Paikin'

Attention, Canadian readers: tonight I'll be on The Agenda With Steve Paikin at 8 p.m. tonight to talk about obesity. Remember how I was going to blog about Kate Harding's post on Jezebel? You know how I'm doing all this obesity stuff in the media? You know how some people think I'm an ally, some people think I'm a fat-acceptance zealot, and some people think I'm a just another fat-hating member of the mainstream media?  Let's debrief on these topics after...

Hoarding as Art: What You Didn't See on Oprah

  Today, Oprah Winfrey spent her entire show speaking with participants from the A&E's reality program Hoarders. Hoarders profiles families who's homes have been overcome by clutter, and brings in professional organizers to try and help clear a literal and metaphorical path through all the accumulated crap. The show is ... terrifying, especially for those of us with a giant junk drawer full of old class photos, broken pencils, dead batteries, and faded receipts overflow that we just can't...

Good Hair Week: The Week Ahead

We've got big plans for Good Hair Week, both on the blog and on the main site. Keep checking back for new content on the science and sociology of our hair. While we have a few surprises in store, here's what you can expect this week: Tuesday The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Sometimes beautiful hair comes at an ugly price. We go undercover into the seedy world of professional hair models and hear stories about the worst clients in upscale salons. Wednesday The Straight Truth: Curly...

Share Your Hair Stories and Photos

Did bad hair ruin your mood? Your job interview? Your wedding?  When you look back on the photos, is the hair as bad as you imagined?  Can you recall an instance when having good hair really made a difference?  We want to hear how hair affects your life—and whether you've taken big steps to prevent bad hair. Submit your stories to newsweek@tumblr.com or via our Tumblr page. All week, we'll update the blog with photos and stories submitted by our readers. Note: By submitting...

Celebrating Good Hair: A Week of Follicular Coverage

This Friday, the Chris Rock movie Good Hair opens in select cities. Rock made the film, a documentary about the extremely complicated relationship black women have with their hair, after his two daughters asked him why they didn't have good hair: in other words, the soft, straight, blonde hair we see shaken at us on shampoo commercials. The relationship between black women and their hair goes well beyond the occasional bad-hair day. It's about race, politics, and the expectations of women to...

Sharon Begley Predicts the Nobel Prize Laureates: Blackburn, Greider, and Szostak Win for Telomeres Research

This morning at 5:30 ET, the Nobel Prize winners in medicine were announced in Stockholm (where it was a much more reasonable 11:30 a.m.). In an article last week for Newsweek.com, Sharon Begley wrote about experts who are handicapping the race by selecting  "citation laureates." David Pendlebury of Thomson Reuters measured how often scientists' work was cited by others and, based on that, created a list of Nobel frontrunners. Who were the big winners in the Reuters race? Begley reported...

Why Readers Have Sex: I Never Look For It

After reading Jessica Bennett's article on the why women have sex, it's clear that for everyone, men and women, our motivations go way beyond the need for love or the biological drive to reproduce. So we asked our readers to share some of their stories about sexual motivation.Over the weekend, we'll publish some of our favorites. Submit your stories to newsweek@tumblr.com or via our Tumblr page. Submission #3:  I Easily Separate Love From SexReligion is no longer our...

Why Readers Have Sex: It's Better Than A Workout

After reading Jessica Bennett's article on why women have sex, it's clear that for everyone, men and women, our motivations go way beyond the need for love or the biological drive to reproduce. So we asked our readers to share some of their stories about sexual motivation. Over the weekend, we'll publish some of our favorites. Submit your stories to newsweek@tumblr.com or via our Tumblr page. Submission #2: I Often Feel Empty. I, personally, have sex for the emotional connection (love) and the...

Sexy Breast-Cancer Ads: Provocative or Patronizing?

October is breast-cancer-awareness month, and already the country is awash in various shades of pink. But some groups have taken a more direct approach to promoting breast-cancer awareness: namely, by making us all aware of breasts. Big, bouncing, half-naked breasts.While breasts can be sexy, breast cancer is a serious, sometimes deadly disease. And younger activists hoping to draw attention to the issue and recruit younger donors are not above using sex—along with viral video, catchy...

Why Do You Have Sex? Submit Your Responses Below.

Now that you've had time to read Jessica Bennett's fascinating piece on women's sexual motivations, we want to hear your stories. Do you think that sex is something that should be done only when you're in love—except for that one time you wanted to get back at your ex? Are you happy to use sex just as a tool for physical release, and not attach any emotion? Have you ever used sex to get a job, get over an ex, or get validation that you rocked that bridesmaid dress? Did it...

Roman Polanski Raped a Child: A Primer

Readers of this column may remember that I am a big fan of America's rule of law, wherein after one is convicted of a crime, one is sentenced accordingly, then given a chance to start anew once that sentence has been served. That's why I was pleased to see that Roman Polanski had been arrested in Switzerland: I believe that if you plead guilty to unlawful sex with a minor, you should serve your jail sentence instead of fleeing to Europe and living a charmed life for 30 years. (I understand that...

Will the Herbal-Cigarette Ban Make a Quitter Out of Don Draper?

  On Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration began enforcing a ban on flavored-cigarette sales in the U.S. The ban, part of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, puts the kibosh on selling, importing, distributing, or manufacturing any flavored cigarette (save for menthol), meaning you can smoke 'em if you got 'em, but getting them is going to be difficult.Scott Hensley at NPR claims this as a victory for the teenage rite of passage, and cheers the fact that...

Attention 'Glee' Fans: A Hot Tub Cannot Get You Pregnant

Ok, Gleeks: we need to clear something up about last night's episode (everyone else may want to jump ahead a few paragraphs). The most preposterous thing in last night's episode of Glee, Fox's new hit musidey (comical? song-and-dancedy?) was not the football team dancing to "Single Ladies" during the big game. It was not Sandy Ryerson's shortie kimono. No, it was sweet, hot, dumb jock Finn believing that he got his girlfriend pregnant by kissing in a hot tub. They...

Paralyzed Rats Learn to Walk: For Humans, New Hope or Old Hype?

While regaining the ability to walk may not be the first priority for those with a spinal-cord injury (SCI), recent advances in research indicate that reversing paralysis—at least when it comes to getting out of the wheelchair—may be closer than ever before. A study published this week in the journal Nature Neuroscience shows that scientists were able to restore motor function to rats with severed spinal cords thanks to a combination of pharmacological agents and electrodes implanted under...

Laurie Garrett, Swine Flu, and Me: I Survived H1N1. It Wasn't That Bad.

This week in NEWSWEEK, writer Laurie Garrett has a gripping account of being sick with swine flu. Not only is Garrett a flu expert, having written The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance (Penguin  1995) and a Newsweek cover story on the H1N1 epidemic, she's a senior fellow on the Council for Foreign Relations and has been following H1N1 from the start. And  yet, Laurie Garrett got swine flu. And while I am not nearly the authority she is on the subject, I am...

Patrick Swayze Dies From Pancreatic Cancer

We were saddened to learn about the death of Patrick Swayze at age 57 from pancreatic cancer. I keep saying that there's no good cancers, but recent high-profile celebrity cases have featured some of the worst. Pancreatic cancer, unless caught very early, is pretty much a death sentence. Up against a four percent survival rate over five years, Swayze's prognosis never looked great. Still, he and his people always assured the public he was fighting the disease and feeling positive...

Serena Williams's Tennis Tantrum: Five Memorable On-Court Freakouts

Kim Clijsters made short work of opponent Caroline Wozniacki to take the U.S. Open women's singles title tonight. But a victory for Clijsters─who returned to tennis with low expectations after she took a two-year break to have a baby─will not be what most people remember about this Open. Instead, they'll be talking about Serena Williams's tirade against a line judge: an outburst that cost Williams the match and, later, a $10,000 fine.Clijsters and Williams had been...

Tru Blood Beverage: A Taste Test

  I don't watch HBO's soapy vampire drama True Blood. I like the idea of the show and always thought I would get around to checking it out, but so far—despite the frequent convincing arguments made by my colleague Joan Raymond—I have yet to do so. Still, I think I get the conceit: vampires are real, they walk among us, and thanks to an artificial blood substitute called Tru Blood, they can feed without having to bite human's necks to do so. But some humans still think that...

Introducing the Fit, Fat Gallery: Reflections on the Fat Wars, Part 1

A few weeks ago we ran a series called "The Fat Wars" that looked at the way we talk about obesity in this country, and whether our current methods of fighting the war on fat were working. Within the course of the articles, we made a few unsubstantiated remarks about fat people being just as able to run or bike as thin people. (Unsubstantiated because we wrote them as fact, without citing backup evidence.) In doing so,  the article generated lots of comments from people basically calling it...

Your Facebook Health-Care Protests: Why You Changed Your Status (Or Didn't)

Last week, thousands of Facebook users updated their status to reflect their support for health-care reform. As Jenny Hontz reported at the time, small gestures like this can make a big difference not only by reminding progressive politicians that the Facebook Generation—the same group of organized, plugged-in citizens who helped elect Obama—are still a force, but also by countering the loud, angry town halls in a more tech-savvy way. But as our readers reminded us, political strategy...

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