Subconscious vs. Unconscious: Writer Russ Juskalian, Two Psychologists, Freud, and Wikipedia Respond to Your Comments

Writer Russ Juskalian's story on cryptomnesia had a lot of readers talking—specifically, about our use of "unconscious" over "subconscious" when discussing the practice of copying other people's work without realizing it. So we asked Russ to further explain the language he used in the article. His response, below: Unconscious, as a few people pointed out, can mean "not conscious"—as in knocked out. But the term also means unaware of, or "done or existing without one realizing." Those...

"Where's My Crazy Hot Guy?" A Female Designer On Women and Videogames

More female videogamers are grabbing the controller this year, according to a report released yesterday by the  industry-tracking group NPD. The Gamer Augmentation 2009 report revealed that 28 percent of all console videogamers (those who play games on platforms like Wii, Playstation, and XBox) are now female, up from 23 percent last year. Less substantial research suggests that even more PC gamers are female, with  a Nielsen study indicating that women make up 50 percent of those who play...

Offline and Out of the Closet: Plus-sized Fashionistas Meet Up, Join Forces, and Demand Change

   Strolling through Re/Dress, the vintage plus-size clothing store in Brooklyn, last week, I learned an important lesson in perspective. I was surrounded by cute clothes—frilly lace aprons, sexy leather trenches, pencil skirts, and sailor dresses—and could tell just by looking that not a stitch would fit my size-8 ass. Sizes at Re/Dress start at 14—maybe I could work with something with a narrow cut, or cinch it with a belt?  No. Glumly, I shuffled off to the back of...

From Excess to Exercise: Group Helps Men and Women Live Sober Through Sweat

More than 13 years ago, as Scott Strode was struggling to get his drinking and drug use under control, the gym in Boston where he boxed offered refuge. "All the guys in the gym were sober because they were training for fights," says Strode, 37. "It was a place I could go where I knew there wouldn't be any pressure to use or drink."Now, a sober Strode is recreating the benefits of that safe space for others committed to living sober lives. He's the founder of Phoenix Multisport, a Boulder,...

Michael Jackson's Shocking Death: 'A Third of People Who Have a Heart Attack Actually Never Make It to a Hospital'

It appears that Michael Jackson died of cardiac arrest.  The Los Angeles Times is reporting that paramedics were called to Jackson's rented Holmby Hills home after a call to 911 reported a man who was not breathing, and that he later died of massive cardiac arrest. Paramedics at the scene performed CPR, but they may have arrived too late. According to Dr. Steven Nissen, chair of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, the window of opportunity emergency technicians have to revive...

After Farrah, Her Doctor's Next Fight: 'She's a Role Model for All of Us'

By Jamie Reno Farrah Fawcett's oncologist, Dr. Lawrence Piro, has spent the past few days at the hospital bedside of his most famous patient. The actress died of anal cancer on Thursday morning at 62. But Piro, who seemed deeply saddened by Fawcett's death, remains committed to saving cancer patients' lives. In addition to being the go-to doctor for many Hollywood A-listers with various types of cancer, Piro is a respected lymphoma researcher and clinician who is "very hopeful" that a...

Farrah Fawcett, 1947-2009

After a long, brave, public battle with cancer, Farrah Fawcett passed away today.Fawcett, 62, had been fighting anal cancer since 2006. She invited cameras (and in doing so, the American public) into her private life to better document the grim realities of living with the disease. It was while filming her documentary, "Farrah's Story," that she learned the cancer she thought she conquered had returned. Despite her commitment to health—even going so far as to try experimental treatments...

The Sweet Science: How Our Brain Reacts To Sugary Tastes

"Sweetie," "Sugar," and "Honey." There's a reason we call our loved ones flavor-derived nicknames. "We're all born liking sweet tastes," says Dr. Alexei B. Kampov-Polevoi, a professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. "It's kind of the yardstick for all pleasures." But what does it mean for food to taste sweet? And how does that taste affect our brains and our bodies?  The desire for sweetness is hardwired into humans--give babies a little sugar on...

John Mayer, Perez Hilton, and the Politics of Victim Blaming

Yesterday, Perez Hilton got punched in the face. This lead to karma jokes, and "I've been wanting to punch him in the face for years" jokes, and all sorts of tacky, tasteless comments that make light of the fact that someone was the victim of violence. Yes, Perez is a pain; a pain who ridicules both gay rights activists and gay rights critics when not drawing crude genitalia on paparazzi photos. Did he deserve a beating? No: no one does. And yet that fact gets obscured when the victim of...

Good News About Birth Control

The withdrawal method of birth control—otherwise known as "pulling out"—is often seen as a last-ditch, almost comical measure to prevent pregnancy. In terms of both effectiveness and sexual sophistication, it's seen as just a rung or two above using Coke as some kind of post-coital spermicide (which, seriously—according to every single pregnancy myth website, cola-as-contraception is some kind of epidemic. Does it really happen?). However, the stats don't support this dismissive attitude...

The Consult: Is Obesity a Disorder, and Other News From Around The Web.

Is obesity a disability? Advocacy groups want to classify obesity as a disability; doctors think it will prevent them from discussing obesity with their patients. At the same time, overweight patients often find that, like women in menopause, their size becomes a blinding factor to any other potential medical problem. Knee problems? Lose weight. Chest pain? Lose weight. Bleeding from the eyeballs? Lose weight. There's got to be a happy medium... (MSNBC)  Failing the Smell Test Popular...

In Which I Fly Through The Air With the Greatest of ... Something

Since I am broad-shouldered and have somewhat of a sturdy gait, people tend to mistake me for an athlete. While I played my fair share of sports growing up, I never had the requisite grace, coordination or speed to be anything other than a steady member of the JV squad. (My sister, the college swimmer, got those genes: she did her first triathlon on a whim and returned home with the third-place medal. She also won the mountain bike being raffled off, because her athletic prowess is so great...

The Consult: Pharmaceutical Companies Go Online, and other news from around the web

The New Drug Buddies  Pharmaceutical companies are using social networking and web 2.0 properties like Twitter, YouTube, MySpace, and Facebook to promote their product. As more Americans --children and adults--spend time online, it only makes sense that advertisers will spend time their as well. It also gives them the chance to create more dynamic and personalized ad campaigns based on people's personal web preferences (Washington Post)  Public Obstacles President Obama spoke in front of...

Top Chef Lee Ann Wong Changes Diet, Reaps Rewards

Lee Ann Wong, the fan favorite from season one of Bravo's , has a lot going on: she's now the executive chef for Kogi New York: the original Kogi, in LA, is the insanely popular Korean BBQ truck locatable only via Twitter. On Sunday, she was working along side Justin Timberlake as he launched his new tequilla, 901 Silver, in New York City. (She, along with former contestants Sam Talbot and Huang Huynh, created some drinks and snacks made with 901 that were served at the event). And...

Friends With Benefits: Do Facebook Friends Provide the Same Support as Those In Real Life?

 I have a friend named Sue. Actually, "Sue" isn't her real name, and she isn't really a friend: she's something akin to a lost sorority sister—we went to the same college, participated in the same activities and had a lot of mutual respect and admiration for one another. But since graduation, we've fallen out of touch, and the only way I know about Sue, her life and her family is through her Facebook updates. That's why I felt almost like a voyeur when Sue announced, via Facebook, the death...

Pages of Wrath: A New Book Looks At Why We Seek Revenge

After she was hired to write a blog about a fictional scorned woman who exacts 14 Days of Wrath on her cheating husband, Eva Nagorski realized just how pervasive the theme of revenge is -- from ancient times to the digital age.  In her new book The Down and Dirty Dish on Revenge: Serving It Up Nice and Cold to that Lying, Cheating Bastard (St. Martin's Press), Nagorski looks at the  psychology of revenge, why it's important to talk about this very human reaction, and dishes up lots...

Gender Bias in Babies and Judges

Sotomayor Is Not A Bully She's a smart, tough legislator who challenges lawyers on both sides. Nina Totenberg delivers an in-depth look at the judge's temperament and determines that her style of questioning and habit of interrupting is no worse than anyone else on the bench. A Sotomayor mentor who investigated rumors about her style determined that her questions and tone were the same as men on the Appellate Court, and goes right ahead and calls those rumors "sexist." Totenberg, after...

Will Public Health Insurance "Bulldoze" Your Options?

That's what the group Conservatives for Patients' Rights argue in a new ad:Here's the thing about health care reform: it is both very important and also incredibly boring, which is why these ads are so effective. They boil some facts and figures into scary talking points, add some stock footage of construction equipment, and let the music cues instruction viewers how they should be feeling (in this case: filled with increasing levels of angst).  But what's the alternative? Educate your...

Why It Matters if Jett Travolta Was Autistic

By Claudia Kalb In the aftermath of his son Jett's death, John Travolta told Bahamian police that Jett had autism. This according to police reports published by the National Enquirer (which, while not the most respected news source, have gotten scoops on big stories. They also pay their sources, which helps them obtain documents like these). If true, this admission marks a long-awaited moment.Hollywood types and autism advocates had been speculating about Jett's condition for years...

UPDATED: Insurance Companies Seek Healthy Profits in Tobacco Stock

By Jaime CunninghamThis article has been updated with a response from one of the companies mentioned. Sure, smoking kills. But it's so lucrative! That seems to be the attitude of health and life insurance companies in North America and the United Kingdom, who have more than $4 billion invested in tobacco companies, according to a correspondence published in the June 4th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (subscription required). The same companies that could deny you coverage...

The Consult: Cigarettes Are Not Candy And Other News From Around The Web

Nicotine Delites? We've heard of candy cigarettes, but this is ridiculous. RJ Reynolds is introducing a tobacco-based mint for adults (because grown-up loooove candy) sold in shiny packaging. It makes business sense for tobacco companies to try and branch out to smokeless products now that it's illegal to light up at so many bars and restaurants, but candy? Come on. When your product makes Camel Snus look like a good idea, it's time to fire your development team....

Chemistry Is Not Boring: Video Proof

Via Andrew Sullivan, a fun little video about the elements. (If one finds same-sex slow dancing NSFW, this video is NSFW.)The website featured at the end of the video is for a careers page at the European Commission's research department. I was hoping for something a little cooler from a link that ended with "MarieCurieActions."  Still, Europe always have the cooler, sexier science and health ads: even their chemistry help-wanted ads are sexy.  "Playing Safely," the online safe-sex...

The Consult: Fruit for Free, And Other News From Around The Web

Just Do It, Already: Rates of colorectal cancer are up in 27 of 51 countries worldwide between 1983 and 2002. A new study shows that the increase in cancer rates is likely due to an increase in Western diet and lifestyle habits across the globe. Since most of this blog's readers probably already have Western lifestyle habits, this is a good chance to remind those over 50 to schedule that colonoscopy. (Eurekalert) Peaches for Free And plums, and lemons, and cherries. The New York Time on...

In Defense of Dixie: "Exorcise Video" Haters Miss The Point

  This video has been making the blog-rounds for a few weeks now; I'm totally late to the bandwagon. But I'm posting it anyway because: 1) My love for Miss Julia Sugarbaker is real and true, and that love extends to posting excerpts from Dixie Carter's late-80s yoga video. 2) Much of the reaction to this video has been of the "God, what a loon!" variety, which totally misses the point. Yes, the pose looks ridiculous, which she admits straight away.  But she doesn't...

The Consult: Back to Bed, and Other News From the Web

Sleep On It: Feeling blocked? Researchers from the University of California at San Diego say a nap can help boost creative powers. They say that "sleeping on" a dilemma really does boost a person's ability to problem-solve and make clear decisions:77 volunteers were given a series of create problems to solve and were told to mull over the problem until the afternoon either by resting but staying awake or by taking a nap monitored by the scientists. Compared with quiet rest and non-REM...

Really, Really Dirty Dancing: More On Daggering

This article is an update to the post we published on FridayIn the video, (NSFW) a young woman stands on her head, legs spread. Two men stand straight on either side of her. As crowds look on, the two men begin to push her back and forth by her ankles until finally she's flipped over and thrown into one man's arms, legs over his shoulders. As he gyrates and thrusts onto her limp body, the DJ in the background urges them on. The woman is then thrown back to the other man, who grabs her from...

The Consult: Easing Into Monday, And Other News From The Web

A Woman's Victorious Tale of Cancer Survival: A nice read for those of you (like me) moving a little slowly this morning. No need to rush into the work week head on! (Pharmablog)Tickling Gorillas: Will be the name of the NEWSWEEK.com house band. It's also part of a process scientists are using to categorize human laughter. This is old news to fans of public radio, since it was featured on Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me this weekend, but if you want more of the science behind...

Andrew Sullivan's Brave and Brilliant Abortion Blogging

Take some time today to visit Andrew Sullivan's blog over at the Atlantic, where one of the most capital-F fascinating discussions in recent blog history (which is pretty much all of blog history) is taking place. After the murder of Kansas physician George Tiller, Sullivan—the deeply Catholic, economically-conservative pundit—did a great job of  covering the political and sociological implications of the crime. But he also started posting first-person accounts of...

EMT Charged in Facebook Crime-Scene Photo Leak

Last month, NEWSWEEK's Jessica Bennett's wrote a heartbreaking story about the Catsouras family, who are fighting to scrub the internet of gristly accident-scene photos taken moments after their daughter Nikki's death. Now, another tale of private, post-mortem photos posted online has made the news. CBSNews reports that a New York City emergency medical technician was charged today with official misconduct for posting to his Facebook page crime-scene photos of a murder victim....

The Consult: The Sum Of Your Parts, And Other News From Around The Web

When Is A Donor Kidney Not a Donor Kidney? When it comes from the body of a convicted killer. A very small British study showed people were strongly wary of organ transplants if the donor had questionable morals (or no morals, in the case of a murderer). The students polled were much more likely to prefer donors who were good people. No word on how those scores would change were the students polled in dire need of an organ transplant. (BBC) Shake It, Don't Break It A Jamaican dance craze...

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