Reconciling Faith and Reason

Mitt Romney argues that people of faith share a common creed of moral convictions. But is that really true? And where does human reason enter the equation?

Gellman: Are Miracles Real?

Indian guru Sri Chinmoy was able to lift airplanes and elephants and thousands of people. That's why I believe faith without miracles is empty.

Rabbi Gellman: A Prayer for Va. Tech

Almighty God, We ask your blessings of comfort descend like the dew of Heaven for the families of those whose children shed their blood into the concrete and spring grass of a place they had come to for learning and not for death. 

Gellman: Religious Freedom, Captain America and '300'

The great spiritual questions of our time concern the use of power to secure freedom. The world of Islam has never faced the jarring revolution of the Enlightenment, which severed Christianity's ties between faith and power, and, lacking a Muslim Voltaire, some segments of Islam still pine for a restored caliphate in which the sword is wielded by mullahs and the line between religion and the state is obliterated.

Addressing Abomination

The Bible has many names for what we call sin. At the top of the sin hierarchy is a Hebrew word, toevah , which is most often translated as "abomination." An abomination is not just wrong, not just sinful.

Managing Expectations

This week my congregants will celebrate 25 years of my being their rabbi. The ancient rabbis taught that the one who is truly honored is the one who honors others; in that spirit, I wanted to share my joy at this milestone in my rabbinate by offering some words of praise and honor to all clergypersons who have served their flocks for many years.The most important thing I have learned by being professionally religious for more than three decades (I've been a rabbi for 34 years) is that what you...

Send in the Clowns

For many years, I marched as a clown in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Here is some of my clown wisdom:The ordinary streets upon which we travel do not always have to be ordinary.

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