Why Curt Schilling Could Win Teddy's Seat

There were a lot of smirks adorning the faces of Bostonians yesterday morning, presumably a collective judgment on the revelation that retired Red Sox pitching ace Curt Schilling is contemplating a run for the late Teddy Kennedy\'s Senate seat. Of course, those are probably many of the same folks who gave up the ghost back in 2004 when Schilling, bleeding team colors from an ankle tendon that had been stitched up in Rube Goldberg fashion, limped out to the mound against the New York Yankees in...

Starr: Watching Phelps Win His 8 Olympic Golds

My favorite venue at the Summer Olympics in Beijing was the Water Cube, especially at night, when its lights bathed the pathways in soft but colorful purple hues. But stuck inside for nine days, with hundreds of reporters crammed in the bowels of the building, it lost all charm. That was the prospect we all faced if Michael Phelps succeeded in his audacious chase of a record eight Olympic gold medals. Frankly, swimming has never been the sexiest of sports—and even less so now, with the...

Fast Chat With NY Giants Coach Tom Coughlin

He was a dead man walking, soon to be fired. Instead, New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin led his team to a stunning Super Bowl win over the New England Patriots, a story he recounts in his new book, "A Team to Believe In." Ever a good sport, NEWSWEEK's Mark Starr, a lifelong Pats fan, spoke with Coughlin as the new NFL season kicks off this week. You decided to change your style last year, to rein in your temper and be more open. Why? I had not done a good job of communicating. I...

Starr: Manny Ramirez and the Hall of Fame

I confess I have, at times, been quite amused by the former Red Sox outfielder's antics. But ultimately we are talking about a character flaw that should weigh on any assessment of Ramirez's career.

Olympic Preview: Doping and Marion Jones

The games are still more than a week away and would-be Olympians—from the United States to Bulgaria to China—have already tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs. And no doubt more Olympic athletes will flunk drug tests in Beijing. Doping has been part of the Olympics for almost a half century now, and nobody believes Beijing will be an exception. That said, athletes there will be subjected to more tests than ever before—an "anywhere, any time" standard is now in force. Testing...

Olympic Preview: Long-Distance Running

THOSE who view the Olympics through a red-white-and-blue prism tend to regard track's distance events as bathroom breaks. Too bad, because that means they've missed some classic duels, usually between African runners. No American has won the Olympic 5,000 meters since 1964 or the 1,500 since 1908. So how is it possible that a single American could win both races in Beijing? Because if you can't beat 'em, you import 'em. Bernard Lagat, 33, who pulled off that dazzling double at last year's...

Tyson Gay vs. Usain Bolt in Olympic 100 Meters

No Olympic sport has had more star reputations ruined by doping than track and field. Sure, cycling, swimming and weightlifting have all taken big lumps. But so many heroic runners have turned into goats—Ben Johnson, Tim Montgomery, Justin Gatlin, Marion Jones—that we don't feel the same excitement about the new kids on the blocks.Long before doping tainted the sport, though, Olympic immortals like Jesse Owens and Wilma Rudolph wove the sprints into the American sporting fabric, and the...

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