Peter Janssen

The Too-Slow Flow

American giants like UNOCAL and ChevronTexaco began exploring the vast energy potential trapped in Indonesian volcanoes two decades ago, when Jakarta opened the sector to foreign investors.

The Too Slow Flow

American giants like ChevronTexaco and Unocal began exploring the vast energy potential trapped in Indonesian volcanoes two decades ago, when Jakarta opened the sector to foreign investors.

A CROWD PLEASER

Indonesian military leaders aren't known for their fan bases. But the baby-faced Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono is turning out to be an exception. Last week 15,000 people flocked to a football stadium in the northeast city of Manado to catch a glimpse of the retired four-star Army general and the country's newest political phenomenon.

Indonesia's Literary Ladies

At the dimly lit Sudirman International Cafe, the literati have gathered to drink beer, smoke cigarettes and listen to a young woman talk about sex. The scene wouldn't be notable in most cities, but this is Jakarta, capital of the world's most populous Muslim country.

More Than A Prayer

Nicholas Bloy had second thoughts about launching a private equity fund that abided by the tenets of Islamic law, or Sharia. His skepticism was understandable: a truly Muslim fund couldn't invest in a multinational corporation like Vivendi because it owns liquor brands like Seagrams, or Boeing because it produces cruise missiles.

Asian War Games

The United States has had virtually no contact with the Indonesian armed forces, or TNI, for three years. Washington, fed up with the military's alleged human-rights abuses, has banned equipment sales and cut off military aid and training help.

Indonesia: Asia's New Weakest Link

Frail, thin and dressed in flowing white robes, Abu Bakar Bashir doesn't look like a terrorist mastermind. And he's certainly not being treated like one. Authorities in Singapore and Malaysia have accused the 63-year-old Indonesian Muslim cleric of leading a regional network of Muslim extremists whose members have stockpiled weapons and explosives in the Philippines and plotted to blow up U.S. military and business targets in Singapore.