The G20's Global Blame Game

Even as the United States is busy pouring money into its own system, China has ponied up almost a billion dollars to prop up its stock market since the financial crisis. As we saw last week, we're just beginning to see the repercussions, at home and abroad.

The Stars of the Recession

Unlike the last recession, which was characterized by the dotcom bust, technology is booming this time around, in part because U.S. multinationals flush with cash are spending so much money on new software and services to make their businesses more efficient.

New Jobs Aren't Where the Workers Are

Economics is a science that is not just dismal but frequently late, meaning that even as it took more than a year to figure out that the recession was over, it will now take many more to discover definitively what caused it and, more important, to ferret out why unemployment still remains at historic highs even as the economy is growing once more.

Why Do CEOs Make So Much Money?

One of the most startling things about the post-crisis landscape is how tone-deaf the wealthiest Americans remain to outrage over their Croesus-like pay packages.

A 'Recovery' Won't Help the American Worker

According to the Obama administration, this is the Summer of Recovery: the global recession is over, factories across America are ramping up production, and corporate balance sheets are dripping black ink. So why does it still feel more like a Winter of Discontent?

How Innovation Breeds Success in Manufacturing

In the U.S. and the U.K. in particular, there's a sense that overreliance on dodgy financial services is no way to create decent jobs for the masses or to build a more stable economy. In these and many other countries, like France and Germany, influential voices are calling for a return to the business of producing real goods.

Grameen Bank Expands Into America

It's pretty safe to say that three years ago no one could have predicted that one of the few financial institutions to be opening new branches and expanding lending in America would be a Bangladeshi bank that specialized in loans to people below the poverty line (the vast majority of them women). But that's just what has happened.

China Labor Protests and Wages

Because the rise of China is the greatest story of our time, news events in the Middle Kingdom—good or bad—tend to take on epic proportions in the public consciousness.

Companies Had Better Cater to Women

Even before the financial crisis, the spending power of women was increasing in both rich and poor countries. The downturn has accelerated the trend, particularly in the United States. American men lost more jobs (they worked in the hardest-hit areas like financial services and manufacturing), whereas women started more companies.

China Needs Cleaner, Greener Growth

There's no doubt that if the government decrees that Chinese citizens and provincial governments should use more sustainable technologies at home, it will happen. But capitalism may ultimately encourage the process just as much.

Cosmopolitan Elite Bullish On Global Economy

The more cosmopolitan you are, the more optimistic you are about economic prospects, or so it seems, according to a new study by HSBC. The bank surveyed more than 2,000 "global citizens" (a.k.a., people who are affluent, well educated, traveled, and often multilingual) in 10 major world cities and found that they were much more bullish on the state of their own personal finances, as well as the health of the global economy, than the average Joe.

Cosmocrats Bullish on Global Economy

The more cosmopolitan you are, the more optimistic you are about economic prospects, or so it seems, according to a new study by HSBC. The bank surveyed more than 2,000 "global citizens" (a.k.a., people who are affluent, well educated, traveled, and often multilingual) in 10 major world cities and found that they were much more bullish on the state of their own personal finances, as well as the health of the global economy, than the average Joe.

How to Stop Risky Trading

Investors have always looked for ways to reduce risk. But in the wake of the financial crisis, some rather extreme methods are being used, with mixed results.

Threat of Inflation Is Overblown

One of the most common bits of post-recessionary wisdom is that the world is on its way to a prolonged period of high inflation. With all that public stimulus money sloshing around the world, it's only a matter of time before prices start to go up.

A Hippocratic Oath for Davos Man

As the world economic forum in Davos concluded late last week, people were left wondering, Did it matter? It's a question Davos raises every year, when the great and the good trek three hours up a Swiss mountain to spend four days in mediocre hotels drinking lots of espresso and talking about the state of the world.

Davos Dispatches: Why Davos Matters

Does Davos matter? It's a question that gets asked every year at the World Economic Forum, an event that involves the global good and great (think Bill Gates, Nicholas Sarkozy, Larry Summers, etc.) trekking three hours up a Swiss mountain to spend four days in mediocre hotels and a Stalin-esque conference center talking about the state of the world.

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