TAKE NO LOAFERS

German CEO's don't dole out threats lightly. Tough labor laws and some of the world's strongest unions have made it too dangerous. But that came to an end last summer, when Siemens AG gave 4,000 workers at two mobile-phone factories an ultimatum--work longer, with no extra pay, or we'll move your jobs to Hungary.

VICTORY OF VOICE

If you own a mobile phone, chances are you're putting money into Arun Sarin's pocket. The CEO of Vodafone runs the world's largest wireless company, with 147 million customers in 26 countries.

ROYALS: QUEEN GOES GREEN

Is the Queen of England going crunchy? On a recent state visit to Germany, she opened a climate-change conference and attended a forum for young people concerned about the environment.

BUT DOES IT GO?

What do stuffed birds, lanvin gowns, Victorian wombat heads and rare books have in common? They are just a few of the items that Comme des Garcons designer Rei Kawakubo has thrown together in her new London store, the Dover Street Market, a place that redefines the designer emporium.

MAKINGLIGHT OFPLASTICS

Sir Richard Friend is a tough man to track down. Phone calls to his two labs at Cambridge University go unanswered, and so do e-mails. In the end, a reporter has to leave a note in his campus pigeonhole.

MASTERS OF THE DIGITAL AGE

Lee Jong Jin, 51, is no couch potato. but lounging in his apartment overlooking the mountains of Seoul, the international trader has little reason to leave his sofa.

TALK IS GETTING VERY CHEAP

Pity the poor western telecom. First there was the big Internet bubble. Then the bankruptcies and falling share prices. Now the transcontinental fiber-optic networks that major American carriers spent billions of dollars building in the late 1990s and early part of this century are being snapped up in fire sales by foreigners--and Asians are leading the pack.

DIGITAL MASTERS

Lee Jong Jin, 51, is no couch potato. But lounging in his apartment overlooking the mountains of Seoul, the international trader has little reason to leave his sofa.

ECONOMY: NEW AGE 'GASTARBEITER'

Turkey may be one of the fastest-growing economies in the world. It may have cleaned up its banking system, simplified its tax code and become the darling of emerging-market investors everywhere.

A 30,000-FOOT CLUB

Yoga studios in hotels, gyms in airports--what's next for the health-conscious road warrior? In-flight Pilates. Believe it or not, at least two U.S. carriers--JetBlue and Song (the Delta budget spinoff)--have launched exercise programs in the sky.

Eclipse Of The Sun

If alternative-energy companies are so hot, why are their stocks so unpopular? Record-high oil prices make them increasingly competitive. Fear of climate change should brighten their prospects.

Solar? Eclipsed.

If alternative-energy companies are so hot, why are their stocks so unpopular? Record-high oil prices make wind and solar increasingly competitive. Fear of climate change should brighten prospects for any alternative to fossil fuels, which release the greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

A HEAVIER BURDEN

You've heard about the jobless recovery--that strange American paradox of payroll declines in a booming economy. Now, it seems, the Yankee virus has spread to Europe, too.

A NEW ERA FOR 'BIG OIL'

Energy markets have never been more turbulent. Fear of terror, Middle East instability and the fate of the floundering Russian petroleum giant Yukos have driven oil prices to new highs--and stock markets to yearly lows.

EUROPE'S REAL BIG SPENDER

Here's a pop quiz: guess which European government has expanded the public sector at a rate almost unheard of since the 1970s. It has added 50,000 new government jobs, boosted overall public spending by 63 percent and, during just the last four years, increased average pay among civil servants by 20 percent.

FIGHT FOR FATHERS' RIGHTS

A militant new movement is sweeping Britain, generating headlines and sparking protests. In one, a young man dressed as Spider-Man dangled himself from a crane near London Bridge late last year, holding up construction for six days.

TALENT SHOW

Britain has always been a good place for migrants--everyone from Romans to Saxons to South Asian immigrants have set up shop here and thrived. Today, as the threat of terror makes Americans more wary of foreigners, the U.K.

PERISCOPE

INDIA A Passing Grade? Last week Indian Finance Minister P. Chidambaram unveiled his country's new annual budget, trying to prove that India's 13-year streak of free-market reforms wouldn't be derailed by the newly elected, left-leaning government.

THE FEAR FACTOR

How big is the fear factor? On June 1, the first day of trading after the deadly terrorist shooting spree on oil expats in Khobar, Saudi Arabia, the price of a barrel of oil spiked more than $2 to a record $42, or roughly double the amount that most oil companies consider the natural price in normal market conditions.

QUICK READ

Suspended between empire and nation-state, will the "new China" embrace its imperial past--threatening Taiwan, meddling in the economy and blocking Internet sites?

THE FUTURE OF SHOPPING

Antoine Hazelaar has a chip on his shoulder--or rather just beneath the skin of his left arm. It's a piece of silicon the size of a grain of rice, and it emits wireless signals that are picked up by scanners nearby.

The Royal Treatment

Business-class travel used to mean some nice extras--a bigger seat, more entertainment choices and maybe a better meal. But these days, corporate travelers can increasingly expect five-star service in the skies.

A Bridge To Nowhere

It's a breathtaking sight, vaulting the sparkling waters of the Gulf of Corinth. When the 2.8-kilometer Corinth Bridge officially opens in September, it will fulfill a century-old dream, linking comparatively wealthy northern Greece to the far poorer southern Peloponnesus.

The New Dot-Coms

Four years ago, dinner parties in fashionable corners of London and Manhattan were filled with former investment bankers who thought they could be the next big dot-com billionaire.

ROYAL TREATMENT

Business-class travel used to mean some nice extras--a bigger chair, more entertainment choices and maybe a better meal. But these days, corporate travelers can increasingly expect five-star service in the skies.

VIVE LA REVOLUTION!

White-coated scientists don't usually take to the streets, but they did earlier this month at Paris city hall. More than 2,000 French lab directors resigned in protest over a research funding shortage, and 74,000 signed a related petition.

GETTING BURNED ABROAD

Claudio Pugelli has one of the toughest jobs in Italy these days. As head of Committee Argentina, it is the Roman lawyer's duty to tell thousands of aging Italian pensioners that they may have lost their life savings.

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