Making Shopping An Experience

Retail trends tend to emanate outward from America, but the man who's shaking up the trade these days is a London-based Italian. Vittorio Radice is best known for taking over the British department store Selfridges in the late 1990s and turning the stodgy Oxford Street shop into ground zero for hip.

We Can See You

The next big thing in cell phones may be on its way. "Location awareness"--a technology that allows your phone to find the nearest restaurant, police station, friend or relative--was pioneered in Japan and hyped as a killer app in the late 1990s.

The All-Seeing Eyes

No wireless internet offering has gotten more recent hype than one that allows your cell phone to pinpoint the nearest restaurant, police station, friend or relative. "Location awareness" has been labeled the next killer app by industry watchers, and it's here now.

Godfather's Crystal Ball

If Europe had a godfather of technology, it would be Hermann Hauser. The entrepreneur and venture capitalist started Amadeus Capital Partners; Acorn Computers, Britain's answer to Apple; and ARM Holdings, which dominates in chips for mobile phones.

Not As Free As You Think

Headlines tell us that world trade is threatened by the struggle between rich and poor nations that erupted at the last big summit in Cancun. The leaders of the two camps, Washington and Beijing, are now trading tariff threats and counterthreats.

Dial W For War

Recent headlines seem to indicate that Europe poses a threat to Microsoft's ravenous appetites. Pushing a fight abandoned in the United States, European Union trustbusters are reviewing Microsoft's move into the market for digital media, and are due to rule early next year.

Empty Title

If a spate of recent headlines is any indication, there's never been a better time to be a businesswoman in Britain. In the past few months Barbara Cassani, the former CEO of Go Airlines, was appointed to head London's 2012 Olympics bid and sit on the board of Britain's largest retailer of food and clothing, Marks & Spencer.

Empty Title

If a spate of recent headlines is any indication, there's never been a better time to be a businesswoman in Britain. In the past few months Barbara Cassani, the former CEO of Go Airlines, was appointed to head London's 2012 Olympics bid and sit on the board of Britain's largest retailer of food and clothing, Marks & Spencer.

The End Of Minimalism

COVER STORY: DESIGN 2004 THE END OF MINIMALISM SPARE AND SLEEK ARE OUT. THE LATEST TREND IN DESIGN CALLS FOR CHANDELIERS AND VELVET WALLPAPER BY RANA FOROOHAR WITH ANNA KUCHMENT IN NEW YORK Remember the less-is-more esthetic?

Outsiders In

If a spate of recent headlines is any indication, there's never been a better time to be a British businesswoman. In the past few months Barbara Cassani, the former CEO of Go Airlines, was appointed to head London's bid for the 2012 Olympics and sit on the board of Britain's largest retailer of food and clothing, Marks & Spencer.

Finding A Safe Bet

Mobile-phone companies are always trying to sell you the next big thing. Phones that can stream football games, send you movie clips, download a new song or snap pictures are what beleaguered telecom operators hope will bring in the big bucks over the next few years.

A New 'Wind Tunnel' For Companies

Companies are always trying to predict the future. These days, the field of experimental economics--which replicates market and business scenarios in the lab--is giving the crystal ball an upgrade.

An Experimental Mind

On the Hewlett-Packard campus in the heart of Silicon Valley, scientists in the Decision Technology lab are using experimental economics to predict the future of the company.

Listening To The Kids

The term "fieldwork" generally brings to mind biologists, baboons and binoculars. For executives at Microsoft, it involves the study of another kind of unpredictable animal: the teenager.

Fashion: Virtual Vintage Style

Vintage couture has never been hotter. Actresses like Nicole Kidman, Renee Zellweger and Julia Roberts regularly sport vintage evening dresses on the red carpet, and modern designers are reaching back in time for inspiration.

Inventing Hippie Chic

At a time when fashion designers routinely stage shows in railway stations or hire actresses and musicians to moonlight as models, couture as theater is something of a cliche.

What New Europe?

It's surprising that a man so widely despised there could have done so much to frame the way the world thinks about Europe. In Germany last week, U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld repeated his now famous juxtaposition of the "Old Europe," which balked at war in Iraq, versus the "New Europe," which backed the good fight against Saddam, terror and all that.

The Road Less Traveled

Desperate times call for desperate measures. In France this summer, that means being downright friendly to tourists-- something that doesn't come naturally to every cafe waiter and concierge in Paris.

A Country That Works

The computer programmers drink mint tea with pine nuts. The offices are decorated with delicate tiles of azure blue and canary yellow. But aside from the Arabic details, you might mistake the Tunis Technology Park for any high-tech enclave in Silicon Valley.

The Alarmist Of Omaha

Do you know what feline pride means to a money manager? (Flexible equity-linked exchangeable security.) A Synthetic CDO? If the acronyms sound exotic, the truth is that these are garden-variety derivatives, a fast-growing form of investment now used by nearly every major bank and corporation in the world.

Cry For Me, Baghdad

Back in the late 1970s, Iraq was on a short list of the world's most successful developing countries. Baghdad cafes were bustling with a well-educated professional class that presided over a thriving economy, which has since shrunk from $100 billion to (best guess) perhaps $25 billion.

Buying American

Is America monopolizing the business of rebuilding Iraq? In recent weeks Washington has handed out initial contracts for fighting oil fires and reconstructing roads, bridges and waterways--all to American firms, which could end up earning millions or even billions for their efforts.

No More Mary Poppins

A good British nanny used to be hard to find. Mostly high-powered bankers, lawyers and big media types--fat on the '90s equities boom--could afford them. Experienced nannies commanded salaries that rose in lock step with those of their employers--roughly £25,000, or $37,000, in 2002.

The Phantom Flight

The story rattled bankers and diplomats around the world. Saudi investors, angry over the way their U.S. accounts had become targets of investigation since 9-11, were pulling billions of dollars out of America.

Crime Online

Hackers are everywhere. In a recent FBI survey, nine out of 10 businesses, schools and government agencies had detected computer-security breaches within the previous 12 months, with hundreds of millions of dollars in losses.

A New Way To Compute

Tokyo at rush hour, circa 2012: your automated car whisks you off to Narita airport, steering itself through bustling traffic. You're free to work. Push a button on your watch, and an image of your firm's mining operation in Indonesia springs to life in 3-D.

Life In The Grid

Tokyo at rush hour, circa 2012: your automated car whisks you off to Narita airport, steering itself through traffic. You're free to work. Push a button on your watch, and an image of your firm's mining operation in Indonesia springs to life in 3-D.

A Blow To Global Trade

One year on from 9-11, it's clear that the terrorist attacks that rocked America have also shaken the world economy. But exactly what has been the global economic effect of the disaster?

Why Politicians Are Harmless

The United States and the EU may have growing differences on everything from Mideast policy to the environment, but the past two weeks have proved that their markets, at least, remain as interdependent as ever.

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