Her Eye On The Prize

Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto has been knocked down many times. Dictator Mohammad Zia ul-Haq hanged her father in 1979 and imprisoned her after her return from exile in 1986.

A Fragile Friendship

Many Pakistani men joined the Army to defend their homeland from India. They are ready and willing to fight and die, if necessary. The problem is, for many of these men, they are fighting the wrong enemy.

Perils Of Power

The war on terror made the world glad that Pakistan had a dictator. On Sept. 12, Gen. Proves Musharraf did not need to consult any pesky politicians or civic groups before turning against the Taliban.

PERISCOPE

Arthur Andersen: Begging for Business Enron employees thought they had it bad. But imagine being an Arthur Andersen partner trying to persuade accounting clients to stick with an outfit that used to be your typical boring Big Five firm, but is now known for Enron, document shredding and former partner David Duncan's taking the Fifth at televised congressional hearings.

THE MISSING WEEK

Sometimes it seems like the only person telling the truth in the Daniel Pearl case is the man accused of kidnapping The Wall Street Journal reporter. After turning himself in on Feb. 5, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, 28, told agents from Pakistan's powerful Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) that Pearl's captors had sent him a coded message saying the American had been executed.

The Toughest Job In The World

The Wall Street of Kabul is a place called Shahzadeh Market. And the closest thing that Shahzadeh Market has to a Master of the Universe is Said Fahim Khaksar.

The Great Conciliator

Even his supporters say that Hamid Karzai is best suited to lead Afghanistan because of what he's not. He is not an obstreperous warlord with blood on his hands, plunder on his mind and a ragtag army.

Delivered From Evil

Heather Mercer and Dayna Curry were used to being roused from their cell beds by ranting soldiers toting AK-47s. Since the U.S. bombing campaign started five weeks earlier, their Taliban captors had kept the two American aid workers and six other Western hostages on the run with them nearly every night.

The Next Battle

In the cities and towns of war-torn Afghanistan, the lightning collapse of Taliban control has felt to many like liberation. Men have cut off their long beards, children have flown kites, women have listened to musty old film songs.

Saving The Coral Reefs

For 34 years said Nuhung made a fairly easy living as a fisherman. He would take his small boat out off the coastal village of Tumbak, on the eastern coast of Indonesia's North Sulawesi province, to the reefs.

East Timor: A Victory For One, Not Many

Once upon a time the result would have been clear cause for celebration: a tiny country frees itself from the shackles of a colonizing power and, in free and democratic elections, brings its freedom fighters to power.

Ring In The Old

Indonesia's most famous housewife suddenly has a much bigger house. After nearly two years as a silent and often sidelined vice president--and six months of quietly backing her former boss Abdurrahman Wahid into a corner--Megawati Sukarnoputri now has the keys to the palace where she grew up.

After The Ouster

Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid predicted a national calamity if the country's supreme political body, the People's Consultative Assembly, or MPR, removed him from office on allegations of corruption and incompetence.

Transplanted Trouble

Hill 1200 is a long way from Afghanistan. But the view from the Thai military outpost, which sits along the Burmese border, is awfully familiar. Until the Taliban banned its cultivation last year, the fields of arid Afghanistan were filled with opium poppy--75 percent of the world's supply.

A Mother's Search

As Pham Kim Hy displays the carefully preserved keepsakes-baby clothes, booties, a red Ho Chi Minh Youth neckerchief, high-school notebooks-that belonged to her son, Ho Viet Dung, her eyes well with tears.She pulls out a family photo album filled with faded snapshots of the handsome young man.

North Korea: A Portrait Of True Grit

Park Choong Il is lucky to be alive, but is prepared to die. He keeps a small plastic bag filled with rat poison in his pocket. "I would rather kill myself than be taken back to prison in North Korea," says the 23-year-old former street urchin, who recently escaped from Kim Jong Il's dictatorship for the second time in 18 months. "I don't even like to remember what happened to me.

North Korea: A Portrait Of True Grit

Park Choong Il is lucky to be alive, but is prepared to die. He keeps a small plastic bag filled with rat poison in his pocket. "I would rather kill myself than be taken back to prison in North Korea," says the 23-year-old former street urchin, who recently escaped from Kim Jong Il's dictatorship for the second time in 18 months. "I don't even like to remember what happened to me.

A Military Comeback

Indonesian Army Gen. Endriartono Sutarto seems at his best in tight spots. In 1998, just before the fall of President Suharto, Lt. Gen. Prabowo Subianto, the former dictator's powerful son-in-law, demanded that Sutarto swear an oath of loyalty to defend the beleaguered president.

Indonesia: The Next Threat To Peace

Thousands of frenzied followers of Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid massed outside Parliament in Jakarta last week. They vowed to attack the building and fight to the death to defend the embattled president.

Indonesia: 'He's Finished'

As thousands of militant supporters of Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid rallied outside parliament today in Jakarta, vowing to attack the building and stop the session inside, lawmakers didn't flinch.

Mega's Moment

It's easy to underestimate Megawati Sukarnoputri. Don't. Her lifelong family friend Abdurrahman Wahid has repeatedly fallen into that trap during his 18 months as Indonesia's president.

The Fruits Of War

Soldiers dressed in combat fatigues and black hoods would normally inspire fear in an Acehnese village. But not these commandos. As nearly a dozen fighters approach the edges of a hamlet some 30km southwest of the town of Bireun, their hoods are revealed to be jilbab--the Muslim head scarves worn by women.

The Scare Spreads East

The last thing Dr. Somwang meant to do was start a panic. For weeks, rumors had circulated that mad-cow disease had struck its first human victims in Thailand.

A GLOBAL GAP

For all his adult life, Van Thavi, 33, and his neighbors in the remote Cambodian village of Robib had been cut off from civilization, courtesy of Pol Pot's ruthless army.

Indonesia V. Suharto

During his 32-year autocracy, Indonesian President Suharto had a knack for keeping people in doubt about his plans. He was a man of few words. He rarely said "yes" or "no." Rather, he would convey decisions by body language--a grunt, a nod of the head or stony silence--which his top aides would then interpret to the public.

Peace Unrequited

Maria de Fatima Ximenes Diaz is not easily defeated. A year ago Indonesian soldiers and East Timorese militiamen burned her home and destroyed her clinic in an orgy of killing, looting and arson.

An Island Holy War

The headquarters for the Islamic Protection Front (FPI) seems more like a Club Med resort than a command center for anti-Christian warriors on the Moluccan Islands.

Foiling The Brotherhood

Usually, the loudest noises in the jungles of northern Malaysia are the screeches of wild monkeys and the whine of the occasional buzz saw. But for five tense days last week, the jungle became a battleground.

Is Gus Dur Out Of Touch?

Masseurs don't normally get involved in the financial affairs of state, but then most countries are not run like Indonesia. In early January a man named Suwondo, who worked as both a masseur and a business partner for Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid, went on an unusual errand.

South Korea's Vietnam

April 1, 1967, should have been a forgettable day for Nguyen Van Thoi. He'd trudged off, as he did most mornings, to work in the rice fields near his village of Vinh Xuan in South Vietnam.

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