Steven Levy

Smile! You're an Unwitting Net Star.

By now you've heard enough about Michael Richards's racist meltdown at a Los Angeles comedy club. Plenty has been said about the content of his outburst, but not as much on the speed and thoroughness with which the news spread.

Zune Should Go Beyond 'Squirting'

Have you squirted a song yet? That's the question Microsoft hopes your friends will ask you as you ponder which digital music player to acquire. Although you are more likely to buy an iPod this season--something even Microsoft admits--the software giant from Redmond is running a huge marketing campaign that it hopes will plant some seeds of doubt.

Playstation Strikes Back

Sony's long-awaited new console has the computing power to bring games to the next level—what gamers call 'total immersion.' But good luck trying to find one.

Interview: The Father of PlayStation

On the eve of the Play-Station 3 launch, Ken Kutaragi, the head of Sony Computer Entertainment and the creator of all three generations of the hit game console, took time off to give a rare interview to NEWSWEEK's Steven Levy, via phone from Tokyo.

Brightcove: A Safe Harbor?

Since google bought youtube for $1.65 million last month, CEOs of other Internet video-related companies have been very popular. Jeremy Allaire is no exception.

Tune Into Zune?

Whether or not Apple's iPod is mortal, you can depend on Microsoft to keep trying to invent an iPod killer. To the Softies in Redmond, Wash., the thought of an Apple digital music device capturing three-quarters of the marketplace—and worse, an online store that handles over 80 percent of all legal music downloads—is more than a constant irritant.

Brightcove: A Safe Harbor?

Since google bought youtube for $1.65 million last month, CEOs of other Internet video-related companies have been very popular. Jeremy Allaire is no exception.

Technology: A New Way To Blog

Some bloggers aren't in the game to garner fame, earn fortune or take down politicians--they simply want to share their thoughts, songs and videos with friends and family.

The Power of iPod

The iPod arrived in October 2001, bringing the promise of pleasure to a world in transformation from its comforting analog roots to a disruptive digital future.

Gadgets: Constant Reader

Feel like lugging 80 books to your beach vacation? Didn't think so. But if the books were downloaded into the new Sony Reader, maybe you'd do it. No bigger than a mass-market paperback--and a lot trimmer--this electronic reading device indeed holds up to 80 electronic books (and even more if you use an optional memory stick).

Now on GooTube: The Price Is Right

Two cultures bumped (if not collided) in the wake of Google's $1.65 billion purchase of the Web video site YouTube. First came the Google conference call announcing the sale.

Gadgets: MP3, Reloaded

Most music lovers prefer to own their tunes, but more than a million subscribe to "the celestial jukebox"--paying a fee for unlimited plays from a vast catalog of songs.

Sticking to The Business

While some entrepreneurs in the current boom are proving that there are second acts in America, others are quietly proving that the first act isn't over. Case in point: Jake Winebaum.

Celebrating a Web That's Free--For Now

On the morning of OneWebDay--which occurred, in case you were too busy actually using the Web to notice, on Sept. 22--I had breakfast with Susan Crawford, the Cardozo Law School professor who organized the global event, and Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist, who would speak at a lunchtime rally at the southern tip of Manhattan.

Wisdom From the Big Digg

Some people say that the current Internet boom peaked when a national business magazine put a 29-year-old dude on the cover, declaring that the kid made $60 million in 18 months.

Gadgets: Getting Smaller

Christmas stockings, beware: you are about to undergo an invasion of small metallic devices. Apple's revamp of the iPod line includes a redesigned nano that features a more smudge-resistant aluminum skin (reminiscent of the covering on the ultrasleek mini-iPod) that comes in five colors, including a luminescent blue and a shocking pink.

Make Room on the Couch for Steve

Steve Jobs's talk last week was nearing an end and coming dangerously close to a letdown. The stuff he introduced--a freshening-up of the iPod line and the ability to download movies on iTunes--had been largely expected.

The Search Is On

What could be more revealing than a list of one's search queries? The efficiency of finding what we need on the Web encourages us to quest away--whether we're researching a car purchase, puzzling out some medical symptoms, wondering what happened to an old friend, or (gasp) groping for erotica. "Your search record involves aspirations and dreams," says Marc Rotenberg of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. "It becomes almost a reflection of what's in one's head." And, as we learned...

Living A Virtual Life

Two years into the history of World of Warcraft--an online game that accommodates 7 million players around the world--no one had successfully ventured into the dungeon to slay a group of computer-generated villains known as the Four Horsemen.

Mao's Revenge

Jaron Lanier is a man of many talents--virtual-reality pioneer, New Age composer, visual artist and artificial-intelligence scientist. Now Lanier has taken on another role: dyspeptic critic of the surging trend of digital collectivism, an ethic that celebrates and exploits the ability of the Web to aggregate the preferences and behaviors of millions of people.

Will You Let Them Store Your Dreams?

What could be more revealing than a list of one's search queries? The efficiency of finding what we need on the Web encourages us to quest away--whether we're researching a car purchase, puzzling out some medical symptoms, wondering what happened to an old friend or (gasp) groping for erotica. "Your search record involves aspirations and dreams," says Marc Rotenberg of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. "It becomes almost a reflection of what's in one's head." And, as we learned...

Poking a Stick Into The 'Hive Mind'

Jaron Lanier is a man of many talents--virtual-reality pioneer, New Age composer, visual artist and artificial-intelligence scientist. Now Lanier has taken on another role: dyspeptic critic of the surging trend of digital collectivism, an ethic that celebrates and exploits the ability of the Web to aggregate the preferences and behaviors of millions of people.

Technology: Hooray, Hard Disk!

If there's a bottle of vintage champagne you've been saving, next month is the time to pop it open: it's the 50th anniversary of hard-disk storage. Don't laugh.

My Secret Life as a Penny-Stock Tout

Gotten any spam lately? Of course you have. Despite blockers, blacklists, whitelists and even federal regulation, those infuriating incursions on your in box continue.

Will the 'Tail' Kill The Water Cooler?

It used to be that taking a break from work to fill up our Dixie Cups at the water cooler was a ritual accompanied by harmless conversation about a predictably limited number of pop-culture subjects.

Geezer-Pleasers

There's an upside and a downside to being a music-loving baby boomer. The upside is that you had a chance to see Jimi Hendrix, the Doors and maybe even some of the original Motown groups.

All Predators, All the Time? Maybe Not.

Dateline NBC's" "To Catch a Predator" series is can't-take-your-eyes-off-it television. The format is familiar by now: lured by the promise of sexual contact with a minor discovered in an Internet chat room, one creepy adult after another shows up at a house where parents are supposedly away.

Bill Gates Goes Part Time at Microsoft

For two years now, Bill Gates has been wrestling with a dilemma. As his foundation, funded by $29 billion of his donations, became increasingly influential in fields like global health and education, it became clear that if he spent more time there, it could have a huge impact on the world.

Going Faster

One of the tougher jobs in high tech is making a transition from a dying technology to a thriving one. Such is the task of Garry Betty, CEO of one of the nation's oldest Internet service providers.

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