Barack Obama, Cory Booker and Others Commemorate the 55th Anniversary of 'Bloody Sunday' March

Former President Barack Obama, Congressman John Lewis, Senator Cory Booker and other prominent politicians commemorated the 55th anniversary of the historic "Bloody Sunday" march.

On March 7, 1965, about 600 civil rights leaders marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama on their way to Montgomery, the state capital, in a protest for voting rights. The peaceful demonstrators were violently pushed back across the bridge by law enforcement officers.

Obama honored the event in a tweet Saturday: "55 years ago, when a group of civil rights organizers crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they carried America with them. Today, let's honor that legacy by continuing their work to protect and exercise our foundational right to vote."

55 years ago, when a group of civil rights organizers crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they carried America with them. Today, let's honor that legacy by continuing their work to protect and exercise our foundational right to vote. pic.twitter.com/zhMeTA3kFj

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) March 7, 2020

Lewis, who was one of the protesters from the march decades ago, also paid homage. "55 years ago today," he wrote on Twitter, "we were beaten, tear gassed, and trampled by horses. I thought I saw death. I thought I was going to die. I don't know how I made it back, but I know we cannot rest. We cannot become weary. We must keep pushing and pulling and find a way to get in the way."

55 years ago today, we were beaten, tear gassed, and trampled by horses. I thought I saw death. I thought I was going to die. I don't know how I made it back, but I know we cannot rest. We cannot become weary. We must keep pushing and pulling and find a way to get in the way. pic.twitter.com/gg6n1CyJls

— John Lewis (@repjohnlewis) March 7, 2020

Booker wrote in a Facebook post that "the courage of those protesters compelled action and inspired change. Later that summer the Voting Rights Act was passed into law." He said he is here today because of the actions of the protesters "who saw injustice and refused to remain silent." The senator also referenced Lewis in his post.

55 years ago today, on March 7th, 1955, 600 civil rights activists, led by a young man named John Lewis, set out to walk...

Posted by Senator Cory Booker on Saturday, March 7, 2020

Illinois Senator Dick Durbin also commemorated the occasion: "Today marks the 55th anniversary of #BloodySunday, a day to honor the remarkable courage of the men and women who marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, AL on March 7, 1965, for the fundamental right to vote."

Today marks the 55th anniversary of #BloodySunday, a day to honor the remarkable courage of the men and women who marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, AL on March 7, 1965, for the fundamental right to vote. pic.twitter.com/pSXDZokfJ2

— Senator Dick Durbin (@SenatorDurbin) March 7, 2020

Califronia Senator Kamala Harris also wrote of the event's significance: "55 years ago today, peaceful protestors attempted to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge, marching for voting rights. They were unjustly beaten by state troopers—but they were not deterred. We stand on the shoulders of these heroes and their courage to fight for a better nation."

Her California colleague, Senator Dianne Feinstein, also made comments memorializing "Bloody Sunday and asked the Senate to pass the Voting Rights Advancement Act "to honor the Selma marchers and help restore key provisions of the Voting Rights Act."

Unfortunately, 55 years later, many Americans STILL face unfair restrictions when trying to vote. The Senate needs to pass H.R. 4, the Voting Rights Advancement Act, to honor the Selma marchers and help restore key provisions of the Voting Rights Act.

— Senator Dianne Feinstein (@SenFeinstein) March 7, 2020

New Hampshire Senator Maggie Hassan tweeted: "This #Selma55 we must honor those who have sacrificed so much in the hopes of creating a more equal and free America."

It's been 55 years since state troopers brutally attacked peaceful protesters marching from Selma to Montgomery. This #Selma55 we must honor those who have sacrificed so much in the hopes of creating a more equal and free America.

— Sen. Maggie Hassan (@SenatorHassan) March 7, 2020

Lewis, who is currently battling stage four pancreatic cancer, memorialized "Bloody Sunday" at an event in Selma earlier this week with other U.S. lawmakers. He wrote in a tweet: "We were beaten, we were tear-gassed. I thought I was going to die on this bridge. But somehow and some way, God almighty helped me here. We cannot give up now. We cannot give in. We must keep the faith, keep our eyes on the prize."

We were beaten, we were tear-gassed. I thought I was going to die on this bridge. But somehow and some way, God almighty helped me here. We cannot give up now. We cannot give in. We must keep the faith, keep our eyes on the prize. pic.twitter.com/eOw9uMYAAL

— John Lewis (@repjohnlewis) March 2, 2020

Former Vice President and current presidential front-runner Joe Biden joined the event in Selma as well. He earlier tweeted: "As we commemorate the anniversary of Bloody Sunday, we also recognize that the struggle for Black Americans to participate in democracy is not over. We have to fight for a more just, equal America—together."

Selma, thank you for welcoming me back into your community this morning. As we commemorate the anniversary of Bloody Sunday, we also recognize that the struggle for Black Americans to participate in democracy is not over. We have to fight for a more just, equal America—together. pic.twitter.com/aJ5ov31WEM

— Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) March 2, 2020
Bloody Sunday march
SELMA, ALABAMA - MARCH 01: Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) arrives to speak to the crowd at the Edmund Pettus Bridge crossing reenactment marking the 55th anniversary of Selma's Bloody Sunday on March 1, 2020 in Selma, Alabama. Mr. Lewis marched for civil rights across the bridge 55 years ago. Some of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates attended the Selma bridge crossing jubilee ahead of Super Tuesday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images/Getty

Updated 5:53 PM ET, with John Lewis' tweet Saturday.

Correction: March 8, 2020, 5:14 PM ET, updated to clarify that Senator Maggie Hassan represents New Hampshire, not Massachusetts.