The Best Cars for 2018, Across All Categories and for All Budgets

From sensible family runarounds to pumped-up muscle cars, and from $13,000 hatchbacks to $300,000 supercars.Newspress
Winner 1: Alfa Romeo Giulia / Giulia Quadrifoglio. $38,990–$75,095. 280-505 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.6–5.7 sec. Fuel economy: 17-33 mpg. "The Alfa will play as hard as you want, the car reacting not to some computer’s idea of fast but to yours, to the speed of your feet and hands" (Car and Driver).Newspress

The great recession changed the American car market—the average car on the road is now 11-and-a-half years old, compared with just ten years old in 2007, according to IHS Automotive and the U.S. Department of Transportation.

People now tend to buy older cars and hang on to them for longer, much to the chagrin of car manufacturers. And although the economy is now slowly picking up again, car companies are now having to think about a new threat.

Some believe the future of cars could not only be driverless, but ownerless too. Lyft president and co-founder John Zimmer has predicted that personal ownership of cars will be a thing of the past, at least in America, by 2025.

But if your car is pushing the twelve-year mark, or you wouldn't trust a driverless car as far as you could throw it, you might need some advice about which car to go for to replace your old one.

That’s where automotive magazine Car and Driver comes in. They’ve chosen the ten best cars of 2018, cross-referencing their Buyer’s Guide notes and their test track performances, as well as just how cool they think the cars are.

They have also selected a number of other deserving cars in each category. In this slideshow, we begin with the ten winners and then move on to the best cars in each class, from sensible family runarounds to pumped-up muscle cars, and from $13,000 hatchbacks to $300,000 supercars.

Winner 2: Audi RS3. $55,875. 400 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.5 sec. Fuel economy: 19-28 mpg. "The RS3 slices toward apexes with confidence and the sort of forgiving controllability that makes it feel as though we’re adhered to the road via some supernatural force" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 3: Chevrolet Camaro V-6 / SS / ZL1 Coupes. $28,395–$71,295. 355-650 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.4–5.5 sec. Fuel economy: 13-29 mpg. "Imagine meeting Vin Diesel and discovering that he has a law degree, quotes Robert Frost, and speaks with an English accent worthy of royalty" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 4: Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport. $66,590–$70,590. 460 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.8–3.9 sec. Fuel economy: 15-25 mpg. "With its widened stance and radical aero addenda, the Grand Sport is both menacing to behold and forgiving to pilot at warp speed" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 5: Honda Accord. $24,460–$36,690. 192-252 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 5.5–7.3 sec. Fuel economy: 22-38 mpg. "Despite price increases that put the Honda near the top of this class, it’s all soooooo good that it remains a great value, so this year the Accord makes its 32nd appearance on one of our 10Best Cars lists" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 6: Honda Civic Sport / Si / Type R. $22,390–$34,990. 180-205 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 4.9–7.0 sec. Fuel economy: 22-38 mpg. "It is quite possibly the highest performing and most satisfying front-wheel-drive car on the market today" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 7: Mazda MX-5 Miata / RF. $26,000–$33,000. 155 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 5.8–6.4 sec. Fuel economy: 26-35 mpg. "As David slayed Goliath, the pint-size Mazda Miata punches far above its weight. It’s nothing less than one of the best cars on the planet, size and modest price be damned" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 8: Mercedes-Benz E400 / Mercedes-AMG E43. $59,895–$72,595. 329-396 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 4.2–5.3 sec. Fuel economy: 19-27 mpg."Truly stylish, satisfying, and special, every detail is impressive in these E-classes" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 9: Porsche 718 Boxster / Cayman. $56,350–$70,850. 300-350 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.6–4.4 sec. Fuel economy: 20-29 mpg. "This car lives for curves, particularly when they’re stacked one after the other; it’s so easy to get into a rhythm behind the wheel" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Winner 10: Volkswagen Golf / Alltrack / e-Golf / GTI / R / SportWagen. $21,760–$40,635. 134-292 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 4.5–8.5 sec. Fuel economy: 21-36 mpg. "Entirely modern but cast in the same basic blueprint as the car that arrived here in the mid-1970s to replace the beloved but antiquated Beetle" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Sports Car: Chevrolet Corvette. $56,590. 460 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.9 sec. Fuel economy: 16-25 mpg. "The Corvette isn’t just about brute force. It’s also an excellent handler, especially in its Grand Sport trim" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Sports Car: Chevrolet Corvette Z06. $80,590. 650 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 3.0 sec. Fuel economy: 15-22 mpg. "Think of the Corvette Z06 as the most amazing version of a sports car that is already amazing by anyone’s measure" (Car and Driver).Newspress
Sports Car: Ferrari 488 GTB. $256,550. 661 hp. Zero to 60 mph: 2.7 sec. Fuel economy: 17-34 mpg. "With a mid-mounted twin-turbo 3.9-liter V-8, the 488GTB generates a sonorous wail and ferocious acceleration all the way to 8000 rpm, where it makes 661 hp" (Car and Driver).Newspress

The great recession changed the American car market—the average car on the road is now 11-and-a-half years old, compared with just ten years old in 2007, according to IHS Automotive and the U.S. Department of Transportation.

People now tend to buy older cars and hang on to them for longer, much to the chagrin of car manufacturers. And although the economy is now slowly picking up again, car companies are now having to think about a new threat.

Some believe the future of cars could not only be driverless, but ownerless too. Lyft president and co-founder John Zimmer has predicted that personal ownership of cars will be a thing of the past, at least in America, by 2025.

But if your car is pushing the twelve-year mark, or you wouldn't trust a driverless car as far as you could throw it, you might need some advice about which car to go for to replace your old one.

That’s where automotive magazine Car and Driver comes in. They’ve chosen the ten best cars of 2018, cross-referencing their Buyer’s Guide notes and their test track performances, as well as just how cool they think the cars are.

They have also selected a number of other deserving cars in each category. In this slideshow, we begin with the ten winners and then move on to the best cars in each class, from sensible family runarounds to pumped-up muscle cars, and from $13,000 hatchbacks to $300,000 supercars.