Man Cites Trump's 'Enemy of the People,' In Alleged Threats To Kill Boston Globe Journalists

A Los Angeles man was taken into custody following a series of threats he made against The Boston Globe.

Robert Chain, 68, of Encino, California was arrested by FBI agents on Wednesday and charged with making Threats in interstate commerce, according to an affidavit filed in Massachusetts' federal court.

The threats to the Globe came after the publication's recent editorial push for press independence. The newspaper's effort drew widespread support by more than 300 newspapers around the country, who followed the lead and published editorials of their own.

Six days after their Aug. 10 call to rally newsrooms, the Globe editorial took on Trump's "relentless assault on the free press" and submitted that the rhetoric "has dangerous consequences."

Following that editorial, Globe staffers reported to local law enforcement about a series of "threatening calls" up until Aug. 22 that came from "an unidentified male caller" with the caller identification log as "blocked," according to the affidavit and first reported by NBC News.

Chain allegedly made these calls from a landline but also would place calls to the Boston Globe's main number using a wireless phone number that the feds traced back to his wife, according to the affidavit.

The FBI started investigating and determined "through subscriber phone records" as well as comparing the male's voice in the various recordings -- that the calls were placed by Chain, the document reads.

In one menacing missive to the Globe Chain vowed to travel to Boston and ". "You're an enemy of the people and we're going to kill every f---ing one of you."

Robert Chain Threat
Robert Chain, 68, of Encino, California was arrested by FBI agents after allegedly making threats to the Boston Globe following their recent editorial about the press. U.S. Department of Justice

In a tweet reportedly capturing one of the alleged threats, Chain puts a time on the alleged violence he vows to enact.

"I'm going to shoot you in the f---ing head later today, at 4 o'clock. Goodbye."

President Donald Trump has repeatedly aimed his ire towards the media since becoming the 45th president, and routinely calling the free press "the enemy of the people."

Trump has taken to Twitter or boomed before his base at rallies seething references about unflattering stories about him or his administration; and has routinely chastised the press as "fake news."

"The Fake News hates me saying that they are the Enemy of the People only because they know it's TRUE. I am providing a great service by explaining this to the American People. They purposely cause great division & distrust. They can also cause War! They are very dangerous & sick! ," the president wrote in a tweet on 5 August.

Other calls allegedly made by Chain upped the lethal rancor, and also the crude factor.

"Hey, how's your p---y smell today, nice and fresh," one recorded call on Aug. 13 that the feds claim is Chain. "We are going to shoot you motherf---ers in the head, you Boston Globe c---suckers. Shoot every f---ing one of you."

The threatening calls left Boston Globe employees reportedly "feeling threatened and scared" and they in turn reached out to the FBI and sought a private security firm "to protect its employees," the affidavit confirms.

On the final day of the threatening calls, Chain allegedly unloaded a rant about how he was defending President Trump and again appeared to weaponize the commander-in-chief's own verbiage.

Robert Chain threat
Robert Chain, 68, of Encino, California was arrested by FBI agents after allegedly making threats to the Boston Globe following their recent editorial about the press. U.S. Department of Justice

"Because you are the enemy of the people, and I want you to go f--k yourself. As long as you keep attacking the President, the duly elected President of the United States, in the continuation of your treasonous and seditious acts, I will continue to threats, harass, and annoy the Boston Globe, owned by the New York Times, the other fake news," the recorded call allegedly states.

Special Agent in Charge of the Boston Division of the FBI considered Chain's arrest as a blunt warning.

"Everyone has a right to express their opinion, but threatening to kill people, takes it over the line and will not be tolerated," he said, according to a written statement. "Today's arrest of Robert Chain should serve a warning to others, that making threats is not a prank, it's a federal crime."

While The New York Times used to own The Boston Globe before agreeing to sell it to Boston Red Sox principal owner John Henry back in 2013.

Chain is expected to appear in federal court in Los Angeles on Thursday afternoon before he is extradited to Boston "at a later date," according to a release by a spokeswoman for U.S. Attorney Andrew E. Lelling's District of Massachusetts office.

Man Cites Trump's 'Enemy of the People,' In Alleged Threats To Kill Boston Globe Journalists | U.S.