Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear, Others Remember Breonna Taylor on 1-Year Anniversary of Her Death

Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear and many others tweeted on Saturday to remember Breonna Taylor on the one-year anniversary of her death.

On March 13, 2020, the 26-year-old Black EMT was killed in a shooting at her home. On that day, members of the Louisville Metro Police Department forcefully entered her home in an attempt to serve a search warrant. Taylor's partner fired, believing the officers were involved in a home invasion. The police shot back, hitting Taylor nine times.

No officers were charged in her death.

Along with the killings of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery, Taylor's death sparked protests across the country with many calling for police reform and seeking justice. They showed support for the Black Lives Matter movement following the three Black Americans' deaths.

Beshear tweeted condolences to Taylor's family and vowed to work hard to improving Taylor's home state for all residents.

"Today we remember Breonna Taylor, her tragic and unnecessary loss and the immense work we have ahead of us. I will never understand the unimaginable grief of Tamika Palmer and other family and loved ones, but I am committed to listening and working with others to build a more equitable and fair commonwealth for every Kentuckian," he wrote.

A statement from Governor Beshear: pic.twitter.com/noZAnnnR9E

— Governor Andy Beshear (@GovAndyBeshear) March 13, 2021

Newsweek reached out to Beshear's office for further comment.

Many politicians remembered Taylor on Friday and Saturday and called for justice. On Friday, Missouri Congresswoman Cori Bush and Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth both tweeted memorials for her. Duckworth noted that she was re-introducing her Police Training and Independent Review Act to work towards "racial justice, police reform and preventing all tragedies like Breonna's."

On Saturday, Georgia Senator Raphael Warnock and Florida Congresswoman Frederica Wilson also tweeted remembrances.

Tomorrow marks the one-year anniversary of Breonna Taylor’s murder. To Breonna’s mother, Tamika Palmer:

We won’t stop making them say her name. pic.twitter.com/C8xL9VQFXh

— Cori Bush (@CoriBush) March 13, 2021

I haven't forgotten Breonna Taylor.

As our nation marks one year since her slaying tomorrow, I proudly re-introduced my Police Training and Independent Review Act — a step we must take on our path to racial justice, police reform and preventing all tragedies like Breonna's. 1/4 pic.twitter.com/r08Wn7hB0x

— Tammy Duckworth (@SenDuckworth) March 13, 2021

It’s been one year since we lost Breonna Taylor. 
 
We cannot forget her—or the countless other Black lives that have been so needlessly taken from us. We must continue to #SayHerName, demand accountability & take action against these tragic injustices. #BlackLivesMatter

— Senator Reverend Raphael Warnock (@SenatorWarnock) March 13, 2021

One year after she was killed, Breonna Taylor's family is still waiting for justice and answers from the police who needlessly took her life. #SayHerName pic.twitter.com/x7x6QQRUU8

— Rep Frederica Wilson (@RepWilson) March 13, 2021

"One year after she was killed, Breonna Taylor's family is still waiting for justice and answers from the police who needlessly took her life," Wilson wrote.

The hashtag #SayHerName—which became a slogan adopted by many protesters in calls for justice for Taylor amidst the summer 2020 demonstrations—was also used in many tweets, as "Black Lives Matter" trended along with Taylor's name.

Besides politicians, many others also shared remembrances and further calls for justice for Taylor, including activists, organizations, and celebrities.

Bernice King, daughter of he late Martin Luther King, Jr., called on Beshear and Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron for "accountability for Breonna's murder."

Actor Samuel L. Jackson and Sacramento Kings forward Harrison Barnes both tweeted messages encouraging their followers to call their local senators to support the "George Floyd Justice in Policing Act which reduces police racial bias and violence against people of color."

We remember you, #BreonnaTaylor. @kyoag @GovAndyBeshear: There must be accountability for Breonna’s murder. She should be here. She was not expendable or merely a casualty of poor decision making. Police gunfire should never be frivolous. pic.twitter.com/OBCNSZ7jQl

— Be A King (@BerniceKing) March 6, 2021

Only one year has passed since Louisville police officers killed Breonna Taylor while she was sleeping in her own home.

She should still be alive today. Enough is enough. pic.twitter.com/0Zhg2qKWW4

— ACLU (@ACLU) March 13, 2021

Today marks one year since #BreonnaTaylor was killed. Join me, @NAACP_LDF & on-the-ground Louisville organizations in calling on your Senators to support the passing of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act which reduces police racial bias and violence against people of color. pic.twitter.com/iSJNKlY5q5

— Harrison Barnes (@hbarnes) March 13, 2021

Today marks one year since #BreonnaTaylor was killed. Join me, @NAACP_LDF & on-the-ground Louisville organizations in calling on your Senators to support the passing of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act which reduces police racial bias and violence against people of color. pic.twitter.com/Ym95sD4Adj

— Samuel L. Jackson (@SamuelLJackson) March 13, 2021

1 year ago, Breonna Taylor was tragically killed in her own home, igniting a movement for racial justice and necessary change, which has prompted many cities and states to BAN no-knock warrants. 365 days have passed but the fight for justice for Breonna Taylor continues!! pic.twitter.com/zqfrVQPznx

— Ben Crump (@AttorneyCrump) March 13, 2021
Breonna Taylor Protests
Demonstrators march along Constitution Avenue in protest following a Kentucky grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC. A Kentucky grand jury indicted one police officer involved in the shooting of Breonna Taylor with 3 counts of wanton endangerment. No officers were indicted on charges in connection to Taylor's death. Drew Angerer/Getty Images