Brett Kavanaugh Is Driving More Republicans and Democrats to Vote in Midterm Elections: Poll

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's controversial confirmation process has motivated more people, both conservatives and liberals, to vote in the midterm elections next month, a new poll shows. However, Kavanaugh's confirmation is not likely to alter the way they vote.

More than 50 percent of registered voters in Tennessee, Arizona, New Jersey and Texas said they were more motivated to hit the polls after the proceedings on Kavanaugh, a CBS News/YouGov poll released on Sunday shows.

Only about 3 percent of people in those states who were likely to vote and were backing a Senate candidate said they would consider supporting the opposing party based on Kavanaugh's confirmation.

"A majority of voters in these states say the issue of Kavanaugh's nomination is motivating them to vote this year, but it could be that the issue is simply giving extra motivation to people who were already likely to vote," the CBS report stated. "The majority of those who said the matter was motivating them also report having voted in a recent midterm before."

The poll was conducted from October 2 to October 5, a day before Kavanaugh was narrowly confirmed on a 50-48 vote by senators.

In Tennessee, 59 percent of voters said they would not alter their vote if Kavanaugh was confirmed, while 63 percent said they would not switch if Kavanaugh had not been confirmed. Republican Representative Marsha Blackburn leads Democratic candidate Phil Bredesen, the poll indicated.

In Arizona, 57 percent of voters said their vote would be unchanged if Kavanaugh was confirmed, whereas 58 percent said they would not change their mind if Kavanaugh had not been confirmed. Democratic Representative Kyrsten Sinema leads Republican Representative Martha McSally for Senator Jeff Flake's seat by three points, which is within the margin of error of the poll.

In New Jersey, 56 percent said they would not switch their vote if Kavanaugh were confirmed, and 63 percent said they would not alter their vote if Kavanaugh's nomination was not confirmed. Democratic incumbent Senator Bob Menendez leads Republican candidate Bob Hugin 49 to 39.

In Texas, 55 percent of voters said they would not alter their vote if Kavanaugh were confirmed, while 63 percent said they would not switch if Kavanaugh was rejected. Republican Senator Ted Cruz leads Democratic Representative Beto O'Rourke 50-44 in that race.

The poll reached out to about 1,000 voters in each of the four states. The margins of error were 3.4 percentage points in Tennessee, 3.5 percentage points in Arizona, 3.6 percentage points in New Jersey and 3.9 percentage points in Texas.

Polls last week showed that the debate around Kavanaugh energized Republicans to want to vote in the midterms, on which Democrats previously seemed to have the edge.

Brett Kavanaugh Is Driving More Republicans and Democrats to Vote in Midterm Elections: Poll | U.S.