California Fire Map, Updates as 7 Killed, 170,000 People Evacuated

Around 1,200,000 acres of California have been burned by wildfires since mid-August, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) confirms.

Seven people have died and some 170,000 remain under evacuation orders. Around 50,000 were allowed back into their homes starting from Sunday, according to an assistant deputy director with Cal Fire, Daniel Berlant.

Over 13,000 lightning strikes since August 15 have led to more than 600 fires across the state, Berlant confirmed.

The largest of the fires have been clusters forming the Lightning Complex fires. These include the LNU and SCU complex fires, which are currently the second-largest and third-largest fires by acreage, respectively, in the state's history.

The largest wildfire by acreage in California's history was the Mendocino Complex fire in 2018, which reached over 459,000 acres.

Statewide fire map for Monday, August 24th. #MutualAid pic.twitter.com/2H6yqosZ0l

— San Mateo Consolidated Fire Department (@SMCFireDept) August 25, 2020

Below are some of the latest updates on multiple fires across the state.

LNU Lightning Complex

The LNU complex fire (which includes the Hennessey Fire across Napa County and Lake County as well as the Walbridge and Meyers fires of Sonoma County) was reported to be at 351,817 acres, with 25 percent contained, according to Cal Fire's latest report Monday at 7:30 p.m. local time.

"Extreme fire behavior with short and long range spotting are continuing to challenge firefighting efforts. Fires continue to make runs in multiple directions, impacting multiple communities," read the latest Cal Fire report Monday.

The Hennessey Fire (which merged with the Gamble, Green, Aetna, Markley, Spanish, Morgan and Round fires) has reached 294,602 acres, with 29 percent contained.

The Walbridge Fire (which merged with the Stewarts Fire) was reported to have reached 54,503 acres, with seven percent contained. The Meyers Fire reached 2,360 acres, with 96 percent contained, the report said.

Evacuation orders and warnings remain in place in parts of Napa, Lake, Sonoma and Solano counties, while road closures are also in place for parts of Napa and Sonoma counties. See Cal Fire's full report posted on the department's official Twitter account for more details on the latest evacuation updates.

 LNU Lightning Complex fire California
Debris piles burn as the LNU Lightning Complex fire burns through the area on August 19, 2020 in Fairfield, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

SCU Lightning Complex

The SCU complex fire, which has broken into three areas including the Deer, Calaveras and Canyon zones, has reached 360,055 acres, with 15 percent contained, according to the latest Cal Fire report Monday at 7 p.m. local time.

"A seasonable weather pattern is setting up and lasting through much of the upcoming week. Fire conditions will be moderated with seasonable daytime highs from the mid 80s on the lower slopes of the Calaveras Zone and mid 90s on the interior portion of the Canyon Zone," the report said.

"Smoke will be most prevalent over the Canyon Zone as westerly transport winds push interior smoke eastward.

"Spotting continues in all uncontrolled areas, resulting in increased acreage," Cal Fire said.

Evacuation orders and warnings remain in places for parts of Santa Clara, Alameda, San Joaquin, Stanislaus and Merced counties. The evacuation order in parts of Stanislaus County has been reduced to a warning. See Cal Fire's full report for details on all evacuation orders and warnings.

CZU Lightning Complex

The CZU complex fire, including the Waddell Fire, Warrenella Fire, 5-14 Fire, 5-15 Fire and 5-18 Fire, across San Mateo and Santa Cruz Counties was reported to have reached 78,684 acres, 13 percent contained, according to a post Monday on the official Twitter account of Cal Fire.

A "small flare-up" was reported near Gazos Creek around 5:30 p.m. local time Monday in the interior of the CZU complex fire, Cal Fire confirmed on Twitter.

Evacuation orders remain in place for parts of San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties, while evacuation warnings have been issued for Santa Clara County.

"Fire was reduced today [Monday] with the inflow of marine air on the CZU Lightning Complex.

"The fire is burning in Southern San Mateo County and Northern Santa Cruz County...the fires continue to actively burn above the marine layer in the heavy timbers and thick undergrowth," the report noted.

Here is a link to the latest #CZULightningComplex perimeter map.https://t.co/Gmbb0tvYpz https://t.co/GYJr6h1ptz

— CAL FIRE CZU (@CALFIRECZU) August 25, 2020

Tehama/Glenn Lightning Complex

The Tehama/Glenn complex fire includes Doe Fire, the Tatham Fire and the Elkhorn Fire, spread across the Glenn Zone and the Tehama Zone.

In the Tehama Zone, the Elkhorn Fire has reached 33,720 acres and "will continue to threaten communities to the north east," according to the latest Cal Fire report Monday at 7 p.m. local time.

Tehama Zone Map pic.twitter.com/tOHRA2pSCh

— CAL FIRE (@CAL_FIRE) August 24, 2020

The Doe Fire in the Glenn Zone was reported to be 18 percent contained. "The Doe Fire has a current total acreage of 153,083 (total acres includes both state and federal land; with 13,000 acres and 18 percent containment on state lands)," the report said.

The Tatham Fire in the Glenn Zone was reported to be at 7,958 acres, with zero percent contained. "The total acres includes both state and federal land, with 2,800 acres on state land," the report said.

Evacuation orders, warnings and road closures remain in places across various parts of both zones. See Cal Fire's full report for details.

Glenn Zone Map pic.twitter.com/JUTuZeMueV

— CAL FIRE (@CAL_FIRE) August 24, 2020

Butte Lightning Complex

The Butte complex fire has reached 3,527 acres, with 40 percent contained. Eight of the 34 fires in Butte County are being actively staffed, according to the latest Cal Fire report Monday at 7 p.m. local time. The eight fires include the following:

  1. 1-2 fire (140 acres; 40 percent contained)
  2. 1-7 fire (100 acres; 40 percent contained)
  3. 1-8 fire (63 acres; 50 percent contained)
  4. 1-12 fire (1,750 acres; zero percent contained)
  5. 1-13 fire (one acre; 30 percent contained)
  6. 2-24 fire (285 acres; 80 percent contained)
  7. 5-4 fire (927 acres; 95 percent contained): The acreage for the 5-4 fire was reduced due to more accurate mapping, Cal Fire noted in the report.
  8. 5-6 fire (261 acres; 80 percent contained): The acreage for the 5-6 fire was reduced due to more accurate mapping, Cal Fire noted in the report.

Several parts of the Inskip/Philbrook area remain under an evacuation warning, while several road closures have also been announced. See Cal Fire's full report for details.

Butte Zone Map pic.twitter.com/3EEHyjEpPl

— CAL FIRE (@CAL_FIRE) August 24, 2020

River Fire and Carmel Fire

The River Fire in Monterey County was reported to have reached 48,424 acres, with 28 percent contained, according to the latest Cal Fire report Monday at 7 p.m. local time. See Cal Fire's full report for details on specific areas under evacuation orders and warnings.

The Carmel Fire in Monterey County has reached 6,695 acres, 20 percent contained, according to the latest Cal Fire report Monday at 7 p.m. local time. See Cal Fire's full report for details.

Some evacuation orders and warnings were reported to have been lifted in some parts of the areas affected by both fires. However, "unburned vegetation will continue to burn inside containment lines, this will cause smoke and flames to be seen," the report said.

Lake Fire

The Lake Fire in Los Angeles County was reported to have reached 31,089 acres, with 65 percent contained, according to the latest Cal Fire report Monday at 7 p.m. local time.

Cal Fire noted: "There is some concern that drainages such as Burro Canyon may experience an increase in fire behavior should the dry southwest win fall in line with the topography."

"Additionally, burning is continuing interior of the fire perimeter, in unburned islands of timber, which have the potential for long range spotting, especially when located on ridge tops," the report said.