Capitol Rioter Had Alliance With Proud Boys, Oath Keepers, Said, 'This Isn't a Rally'

A Capitol rioter, who's an alleged member of the Oath Keepers, coordinated with the Proud Boys ahead of the January 6 insurrection and warned someone online that "this isn't rally," according to prosecutors.

Kelly Meggs, who was seen approaching the Capitol's doors in the military formation known as a "stack," was charged with conspiracy. Leading up to the Capitol riot, prosecutors allege he engaged in "extensive planning," including urging people to "join the fight," and organized an alliance between the Oath Keepers, Florida Three Percenters, and the Proud Boys.

"We have decided to work together and shut this s--- down," Meggs wrote on Facebook on December 19, according to court documents.

Meggs further discussed coordination between the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, saying the Proud Boys "always have a big group" and are a "force multiplier." He suggested people bring mace, gas masks, batons and armor if they have it. Meggs speculated that then-President Donald Trump would use the emergency broadcast system and claim the Insurrection Act, advising someone to "wait for the 6th when we are all in D.C. to insurrection."

There was an "orchestrated plan" between the Oath Keepers and the Proud Boys, according to prosecutors, although it's not entirely clear what that plan was. Meggs sent a message on Facebook that said they would march with them "for a while" and then "fall back to the crowd and turn off."

"Then we will have the Proud Boys get in front of them the cops will get between Antifa and Proud Boys. We will come in behind Antifa and beat the hell out of them," the message said.

capitol rioter proud boys oath keepers
Kelly Meggs, a man charged in the Capitol riot, had an "orchestrated plan" between the Oath Keepers and the Proud Boys, according to prosecutors. Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6 in Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Several defendants in Capitol riot cases have pointed the finger at the perceived threat from antifa for why they were prepared for violence. David Alan Blair told officers he brought a knife with him because he was "worried about antifa and other people trying to jump me," while Dana Joe Winn allegedly brought a flagpole with him to "hit antifa in the head if need be."

Donovan Crowl, who's also been charged with conspiracy, received a Facebook message on January 5 that warned him to keep his eye on "people with red MAGA hats worn backward" because they were rumored to be antifa members.

Ahead of the riot, Meggs and his wife, Connie, allegedly took firearms training classes to prepare to be "security" at the rallies and events in Washington, D.C., on January 5 and 6, according to court documents.

Days before the riot, Meggs received a message from someone whose friend would be in Washington and wanted more information on OK, a presumed reference to the Oath Keepers. Meggs responded affirmatively that there would be more than 200 people in Washington, D.C., and said, "tell your friend this isn't a rally!!" and to be "very, very cautious."

"Insurrection act should be why he is presenting to America," Meggs wrote on Facebook. "Pence announced he is going to allow the evidence to be presented to Congress. That checks all the boxes. I think this is why we were called there. Anything less would be a terrible mistake. The natives are very restless."

In total, the prosecution alleged Meggs was in the Capitol for about 20 minutes but remained in the area for more than an hour after he left the building. He allegedly posted in a Signal channel, "we aren't quitting!! We are reloading," a comment prosecutors told a judge shows Meggs presents a continued threat to the public.

Newsweek reached out to Meggs' attorney for comment but did not receive a response in time for publication.