CDC Warns People Against Eating Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp Chopped Salad Kits After New E. Coli Outbreak

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has warned against eating salad kits linked to a new E. coli outbreak that has led to at least three people being hospitalized.

CDC has advised advised consumers, restaurants and retailers not to eat, sell or serve Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp Chopped Salad Kits with a best-before date up to and including December 7, 2019.

The salad kits are a "likely source" of the outbreak that has caused people in the U.S. and Canada to fall ill, the body said.

CDC said eight people have been infected in three U.S. states: Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin. Three of them have been hospitalized, including one person who has developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported, the CDC added.

The cases of E. coli, in people whose ages range from 21 to 91, started between November 5 and November 15.

The outbreak is caused by a different strain of E. coli than the current outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from Salinas, California, according to the CDC.

Investigators are still working to determine which ingredient in the salad kit is contaminated. Although romaine lettuce is an ingredient in the Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp Chopped Salad Kits, the CDC said they do not know if the outbreak is linked to the Salinas outbreak, which has made more than 100 people sick, KTLA reported.

The CDC said that preliminary information indicated that the romaine lettuce in the salad kits likely came from the Salinas growing region. "If you have any of these salad kits in your home, throw them away," the CDC added.

The kit's ingredients also include green cabbage, kale, red cabbage, carrots, edamame, roasted sunflower seeds and toasted quinoa.

"State and local public health officials are interviewing ill people to determine what they ate and other exposures in the week before their illness started," the CDC said.

"Of seven ill people with information available, all seven (100%) reported eating any leafy green in the week before their illness started. Six ill people reported eating or maybe eating a Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp chopped salad kit. The investigation is ongoing to determine which ingredient in the salad was contaminated."

The CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and public health and regulatory officials in several states are investigating the new outbreak. The investigation also includes illnesses that were recently reported by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

People usually get sick from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli between two and eight days after swallowing the bacteria, according to the CDC. Anyone with symptoms of an E. coli infection is urged to talk to their healthcare provider and report their illness to their local health department.

For more information on E. coli, visit the CDC website.

salad kit
CDC is warning consumers, restaurants and retailers not to eat, sell or serve Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp Chopped Salad Kits with a best-before date up to and including December 7, 2019. CDC
CDC Warns People Against Eating Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp Chopped Salad Kits After New E. Coli Outbreak | U.S.