College Men Try to Ban Porn from Campus WiFi, Saying 'Pornography is Prostitution'

College men are attempting to ban pornography on campuses across the country, The Daily Beast reported.

Eighty male students at Notre Dame University wrote an open letter in the school newspaper asking for a porn filter on the school's Wi-Fi.  

"This filter would send the unequivocal message that pornography is an affront to human rights and catastrophic to individuals and relationships. We are calling for this action in order to stand up for the dignity of all people, especially women," the letter read. "The overwhelming majority of contemporary pornography is literally filmed violence against women — violence somehow rendered invisible by the context."

"Pornography is prostitution through the lens of a camera, but more abusive. It exploits the men and women involved, advances a twisted narrative about human sexuality and harms those who consume it."

Female students wrote their own letter supporting the initiative promoted by the campus men. 

"The wide consumption of pornography does irreparable harm to relationships between Notre Dame men and women. This demeaning and often violent content encourages its users to place the selfish seeking of personal pleasure over the development of committed relationships," the women's response note read. "It makes people believe human connection consists of fleeting sexual intensity opened and closed as easily as a web browser. Thus, it essentially takes away the ability to love."

Both messages mentioned divorce rates in relation to pornography use. Jim Martinson, the lead student writer of the initial letter, said that religion motivated his own concern but understood that focusing on the objectification argument would appeal to more people. "It’s really important to frame things from a secular perspective because you just appeal to more people," he said. 

Although Notre Dame is affiliated with the Catholic Church, attendees of schools including Harvard, Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania also expressed interest in initiating similar efforts to install porn filters on campus Wi-Fi.

GettyImages-909915966 A Pornhub logo is displayed at the company's booth at the 2018 AVN Adult Entertainment Expo. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The Daily Beast reported that there is "little evidence that porn consumption leads to negative treatment of women." However, The Washington Post said that at least 24 studies from 2011 onward show that porn detrimentally impacts brains. Further, research analyzing 22 studies from seven countries showed that "porn use is significantly associated with attitudes conducive to sexual aggression and to engaging in actual acts of sexual aggression in both males and females."

YouGov said in 2015 that men and women vastly differ in how much they watch porn. More than one quarter of males surveyed said they watch porn more than once a week, while only 2 percent of women reported the same viewing frequency. 

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