COVID Deaths Are Highest in These 3 States

Total confirmed coronavirus deaths in the U.S. have surpassed 276,500. The seven-day average of deaths in the country has been rising sharply since early November, after declining from early August and flattening out from early September, according to data compiled by Worldometer.

The total death count is projected to reach around 330,677 by Christmas and surpass 500,000 by January 31, according to the latest projection by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME).

Here we look at three states that have reported the most number of deaths per 100,000 people in the last seven days, according to the latest report Thursday from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Case data below is sourced from the CDC, Johns Hopkins University and Worldometer, while the population data is from the U.S. Census Bureau.

South Dakota

  • Deaths per 100,000 in last 7 days: 2.4
  • Total confirmed deaths: 1,033
  • Total population: 884,659

The seven-day average of deaths in South Dakota has been rising sharply from early October, after flattening out for months since early April, according to Worldometer.

The state's seven-day average of cases statistically declined in a recent two-week period from November 30 to December 3. However, the figure increased sharply from early August, after peaking at 1,458 on November 11, after remaining flat from late March, according to Johns Hopkins.

North Dakota

  • Deaths per 100,000 in last 7 days: 1.5
  • Total confirmed deaths: 983
  • Total population: 762,062

The average death toll in North Dakota has been rising sharply from mid-September, after remaining flat for months since early April, according to Worldometer.

The state's seven-day average of cases statistically declined in the recent 14-day period. However, the figure has been rising sharply from late August, peaking at 1,408 on November 15, after flattening out from late April, according to Johns Hopkins.

New Mexico

  • Deaths per 100,000 in last 7 days: 1.2
  • Total confirmed deaths: 1,673
  • Total population: 2,096,829

The average death count in New Mexico has been rising sharply since late October, after flattening out from early April, according to Worldometer.

The state's average case tally statistically declined in the latest 14-day period. However, the figure has been increasing sharply since late September, peaking at 2,671 on November 20, after flattening out for months since mid-April, according to Johns Hopkins.

COVID-19 funeral New Mexico December 2020
A funeral held at Memorial Pines Cemetery in Santa Teresa, New Mexico for a person who died of COVID-19 complications, pictured on December 3. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

The wider picture

The novel coronavirus has infected more than 65.3 million people since it was first reported in Wuhan, China.

More than 1.5 million people have died worldwide and more than 42 million have recovered as of Friday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The graphic below, provided by Statista, shows the distribution of COVID-19 deaths among the U.S. population.

COVID-19 elderly patients in U.S.
STATISTA

The graphic below, produced by Statista, shows the number of current COVID-19 hospitalizations in the U.S.

hospitalization graphic
Statista