How Europe's Rise in Coronavirus Cases Compares With the U.S.

Novel coronavirus cases in Europe have been slightly rising over the past four weeks, while new infections in the U.S. have been slightly declining over the same period, according to data compiled by the World Health Organization.

From July 13 to August 9, Europe reported consistent increases in weekly case counts, WHO reported. The U.S. reported three successive week-to-week declines from July 20 to August 9, preceded by a rise in total new cases reported in the week starting July 20 from that recorded in the week prior, according to WHO.

Europe has a population of over 916 million across the 53 countries that fall within WHO's Europe region. Despite having a population nearly three times larger than that of the U.S. (over 322 million), the European region reported lower weekly case counts than the U.S. in the past four weeks, according to the data compiled by WHO.

Over the past four weeks, weekly totals of new cases in Europe ranged from around 155,400 to 173,000, while the U.S. reported around 374,000 to 465,500 weekly new infections.

The U.S. is reported to have 15,105 confirmed cases per one million people, more than three times the 3,860 confirmed cases per one million people reported in Europe.

Total COVID-19 cases in Europe versus U.S.

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(as of August 11)
Source: World Health Organization

Europe

  • 3,860.14 confirmed cases per one million people
  • Total confirmed cases: 3,606,373
  • Total population: 916,315,000 (as of 2016)

U.S.

  • 15,105 confirmed cases per one million people
  • Total confirmed cases: 4,999,815
  • Total population: 322,180,000 (as of 2016)

The graphic below, provided by Statista, illustrates a comparison of average new cases in the U.S. and the European Union.

COVID-19 cases EU vs. U.S.
The average number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and European Union. STATISTA

While weekly new cases in Europe have been on a slight upward trend over the recent four-week period, they had been consistently declining since the week beginning March 30 and remained relatively flat for six weeks from June 1 to July 12, WHO reported.

New cases in the U.S. surged from around late March, with weekly totals reaching a peak in the week commencing April 6 before mostly flattening out through June 8.

The weekly totals in the U.S. began to rise again for six weeks from June 15. They hit a new high in the week starting July 20 before declining through recent weeks, WHO reported.

Weekly totals for new COVID-19 cases in Europe

(from July 13 to August 9)
Source: World Health Organization

  • Week starting July 13: 155,462
  • Week starting July 20: 157,546
  • Week starting July 27: 168,119
  • Week starting August 3: 172,817

Weekly totals for new COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

(from July 13 to August 9)
Source: World Health Organization

  • Week starting July 13: 454,916
  • Week starting July 20: 465,546
  • Week starting July 27: 439,845
  • Week starting August 3: 374,070
Montmartre Paris masks August 2020
People wearing protective masks in the Montmartre neighbourhood of Paris, pictured on August 11, 2020. Getty Images

Over 20.3 million people globally have been infected since the virus was first reported in Wuhan, China. More than 12.6 million globally have reportedly recovered from infection, while over 742,000 have died, as of Wednesday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The graphic below, provided by Statista, illustrates countries with the most COVID-19 cases.

Countries with most COVID-19 cases
The spread of COVID-19 cases across the globe. STATISTA
How Europe's Rise in Coronavirus Cases Compares With the U.S. | News