U.S. Coronavirus Deaths Are Lowest in These Five States

Coronavirus deaths in the U.S. are approaching nearly 200,000, according to the latest report Thursday by Johns Hopkins University.

The seven-day moving average of daily new deaths in the U.S. mostly dipped from late April through to early July. The average daily count then mostly increased through early August before dropping again through September.

Below we look at five states with the lowest number of COVID-19 deaths to date. All case and death data below are from JHU. All population data below is from the U.S. Census Bureau.

1. Alaska

  • Total deaths: 44
  • Total cases: 6,432
  • Total population: 731,545 (as of July 2019)

The daily death toll in Alaska remained flat throughout the outbreak, hovering from zero to two, peaking at four on August 25, according to data from JHU.

2. Wyoming

  • Total deaths: 50
  • Total cases: 4,566
  • Total population: 578,759 (as of July 2019)

The number of daily new deaths in Wyoming hovered from zero to two for most of the outbreak. The daily death count climbed to four on April 22, August 19 and September 2 and peaked at eight on September 16.

Yellowstone National Park Jackson Wyoming June 2020
Visitors wearing masks on their way to watch Old Faithful erupt in Yellowstone National Park on June 15 outside Jackson in Wyoming, where the daily COVID-19 death toll remained mostly flat throughout the outbreak, hovering from zero to two. George Frey/Getty Images

3. Vermont

  • Total deaths: 58
  • Total cases: 1,702
  • Total population: 623,989 (as of July 2019)

From late March to early May, the daily death count in Vermont hovered from around two to three, peaking at four on April 16. From around May 4, the state saw several longer stretches of zero new deaths being reported, including from May 29 to June 17, June 19 to July 29 and August 7 to September 16.

4. Hawaii

  • Total deaths: 103
  • Total cases: 10,946
  • Total population: 1,415,872 (as of July 2019)

The daily death toll in Hawaii remained flat from late March to early May, hovering from zero to two, before reporting no new deaths from around May 4 to June 26. From then, the daily death toll mostly increased through August, peaking at seven on August 31, before mostly flattening out again to around two to three daily new deaths.

5. Maine

  • Total deaths: 138
  • Total cases: 4,962
  • Total population: (as of July 2019)

The daily death count in Maine mostly increased from late March to late April, peaking at five on April 23, before mostly declining through late May. Daily new deaths rose briefly on a sharp incline from late May to early June, peaking again at five on June 2. From then, the daily death toll flattened out, hovering from zero to two throughout September.

The wider picture

The novel coronavirus has infected over 29.9 million people across the globe, including more than 6.6 million in the U.S. Over 942,000 people have died globally, while more than 20.3 million have reportedly recovered from infection, according to the latest report Thursday by Johns Hopkins University.

The graphic below, provided by Statista, illustrates U.S. states with the most COVID-19 cases.

Spread of COVID-19 cases in U.S.
STATISTA

The below graphics, also provided by Statista, illustrates the spread of COVID-19 cases in counties across the globe.

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U.S. Coronavirus Deaths Are Lowest in These Five States | News