Cowboys Executive Allegedly Took Upskirt Photos of Jerry Jones' Daughter

The former senior vice president of public relations for the Dallas Cowboys, Richard Dalrymple, has been accused of taking inappropriate photos of Charlotte Jones Anderson, a senior vice president for the team and daughter of team owner Jerry Jones.

Dalrymple is also facing accusations of being the cause of a 2016 settlement between the team and several cheerleaders, ESPN reported. He allegedly entered the cheerleaders' locker room in 2015 and held his phone from behind a partial wall, which was seen by the cheerleaders as they were undressing. The organization later paid a $2.4 million confidential settlement to some of the women, who agreed to not publicize the incident.

In a separate incident four months earlier, Dalrymple was allegedly seen taking photos believed to be aimed at Charlotte Jones Anderson under a table by a fan who was watching a live stream of the Dallas Cowboys' war room during the 2015 NFL Draft.

In April 2015, the fan posted a comment on a local TV station's Facebook page suggesting one of their reporters "look into" what he claimed to have seen during the live stream, according to ESPN. He said in the initial post and in another sent directly to Charlotte Jones Anderson that while several Cowboys executives were standing and celebrating after making a draft pick, Dalrymple allegedly aimed the camera of his phone under Jones Anderson's skirt multiple times.

Dallas Cowboys Richard Dalrymple Sexual Misconduct Settlement
A former Dallas Cowboys executive was allegedly the cause of a 2016 settlement between the team and cheerleaders, and also allegedly took upskirt photos of Jerry Jones' daughter. Above, the Dallas Cowboys logo is seen at AT&T Stadium on September 30, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Those posts were discovered months later by an attorney for four Cowboys cheerleaders who had felt their allegations of an incident that took place in September 2015 were not being taken seriously enough, ESPN reported.

The four cheerleaders were in uniform performing at the Cowboys' Kickoff Luncheon event prior to the 2015-16 NFL season and went to AT&T stadium's cheerleader locker room to change clothes to attend the rest of the event.

While they were in the locker room, Dalrymple allegedly entered the room through a back door. Minutes later, one of the women noticed a phone being held by a man's hand visible around the edge of a partial wall between the locker room and the hallway leading to the back entrance.

One of the cheerleaders asked what the person was doing, and allegedly saw and recognized Dalrymple as he left the room without saying anything. The incident was reported by the cheerleaders to the team's human resources and legal departments. Following an investigation, Dalrymple was allegedly given a warning, had his access to the cheerleaders' locker room revoked, and security policies surrounding the locker room were changed, according to ESPN.

Months later, the women allegedly presented the Cowboys with their attorney's findings, which included the separate allegations made against Dalrymple by the fans on Facebook and a signed affidavit by the fan who made the original post describing what he had seen.

A settlement was signed in May 2016, and the Cowboys paid the four women $2.4 million over the next year. The women and others involved in the case signed nondisclosure agreements to not speak publicly about the allegations or settlement, according to ESPN.

Dalrymple, 61, retired from the Cowboys organization after 32 years earlier this month, detailing his plans to spend time with family to The Dallas Morning News. He denied taking any inappropriate photos or videos of the cheerleaders or Jones, and only ever admitted to entering the locker room, which he maintains he thought was empty, and said he left once he realized there were people inside.

Newsweek reached out to the Dallas Cowboys for comment.

The allegations against Dalrymple are the latest in a series of accusations made against NFL teams, owners and other executives recently. Earlier this month, former Miami Dolphins coach Brian Flores filed a lawsuit against multiple NFL teams alleging racially discriminatory hiring practices and said Stephen Ross, owner of the Dolphins, had offered him $100,000 to lose games during the 2019 season to improve their draft pick the following year.

Flores' lawsuit led NFL commissioner Roger Goodell to say last week prior to the Super Bowl that the league will "re-evaluate" their current diversity policies.

Several former Washington Commanders employees testified before Congress earlier this month describing allegations of sexual harassment and mistreatment of female employees by Commanders owner Daniel Snyder and other executives. The NFL has since said it will lead the investigation into the allegations.

Update 02/16/22, 2:11 p.m. ET: This article has been updated with additional information regarding recent allegations of racial discrimination and sexual misconduct within the NFL.

Update 02/16/22, 1:40 p.m. ET: This story has been updated with additional information about the allegations against Richard Dalrymple.