A Day in the Life of a California Water Cop

California Water Enforcer
Rick Silva, a water conservation supervisor with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, inspects an LA lawn. ABC News

With California set to announce on Saturday draft regulations aimed at achieving Governor Jerry Brown's mandate of a 25 percent cut in water use by cities, ABC News explored what enforcement looks like at street level.

The network followed Rick Silva, a water conservation supervisor with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, whose job it is to patrol neighborhoods searching for water use violators; people who are watering their lawns on the wrong days or during the wrong hours. In other words, he's a water cop.

"We want to get the idea [out there] that you don't need a green lawn for your house to look good," Silva says in the video.

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When people are caught watering their lawns inappropriately, Silva knocks on their doors and offers verbal warnings. If it happens a second time, the offender will be charged a $100 fine. The third time is a $200 fine, according to Silva.

Meanwhile, under the new regulations, water suppliers in urban areas are likely to face fines of up to $10,000 each day that they fail to meet the new water limits, according to the Los Angeles Times.