Delivery Company Sparks Outrage With Picture Showing Cans Dressed in KKK Hoods Lynching a Beer Bottle

The website of the Canadian Coquitlam Liquor, Tobacco and Food Delivery company has been shut down after a post showing cans of beer lynching a bottle, in the style of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), appeared on its domain and prompted a backlash.

The misguided attempt at promotion, which recalled some of the worst racist violence meted out on the African American community by the KKK, showed three cans adorned with White paper cones hanging a brown bottle by a piece of string. The piece of string had been fashioned into a noose.

The Canadian newspaper, the Tri-City News, reported the photo appeared on the company's website on June 3, and was roundly decried as unambiguously racist.

British Columbia Journalism student Ben Mussett tweeted the offending image, explaining it had begun circulating on Facebook. He added the "swift" backlash led to the delivery company receiving negative reviews on Google.

"This company is promoting racism," one Google reviewer wrote about the liquor delivery company. "They have uploaded images promoting hate and acts of violence," they added.

"Your post about supporting racism is going viral you idiot," another reviewer wrote, adding the province's hate line for individuals to report the photo.

Attempting to access the website for the Canadian Coquitlam Liquor, Tobacco and Food Delivery now leads to a '404' error page and the the negative comments posted on Google's review platform have been removed. Replies to the reviews, including one response screenshotted and shared on social media showing the owner apparently trying to defend the image as "not racist," have similarly been deleted.

In its online listing, the delivery company, which services Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody and Pitt Meadows, is now described as "permanently closed." Requests for comment for this article from Newsweek to the company's listed phone number were not immediately answered.

Accusations of racism in advertising on social media and through conventional media are not uncommon. In April, Burger King in New Zealand withdrew a campaign for the Vietnamese Sweet Chili Tendercrisp chicken sandwich after it was denounced as racist. In adverts shared on social media, fast-food customers were shown eating the sandwich with giant chopsticks.

"We are truly sorry that the ad has appeared insensitive to our community," the fast food outlet's general manager in New Zealand said in a statement.

Delivery Company Sparks Outrage With Picture Showing Cans Dressed in KKK Hoods Lynching a Beer Bottle | U.S.