Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell's Threat Of Gun Confiscation Didn't Go Over Well On Friday

Gun owners from across the country, and gun advocates alike, locked and loaded their thoughts toward one Democrat Rep. from California on Friday. Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.) rolled out his plan to use $15 billion to buy back semi-automatic weapons from Americans.

That didn't sit well with gun-totin' social media folks from coast to coast, in which Swalwell sniped back, saying the U.S. military is more equipped to take guns than those who are standing pat with their Second Amendment right to bear arms.

Swalwell tweeted his formula for confiscation of the semi-automatic guns of Americans.

This wasn't it, as there were other threats by Swalwell, who hinted about dipping into the country's nuclear arsenal to make his plan work, as played out by the following tweets.

Joe Biggs sent a message to the Democratic representative saying, "You're outta your fucking mind if you think I'll give up my rights and give the gov all the power. So basically @RepSwalwell wants a war," in his response to Swalwell's proposing a ban on "military-style semiautomatic assault weapons."

Swalwell responded: "And it would be a short war my friend. The government has nukes. Too many of them. But they're legit. I'm sure if we talked we could find common ground to protect our families and communities."

Well, this didn't sit well with Joe gun owners, who chimed in for those who are still on the grid. Gun owners from around the country told Swalwell they won't give up their guns, no matter how the government could try to confiscate them.

Then Dana Loesch, the spokesperson for the National Rifle Association, spoke on behalf of the countless Americans who are members of the NRA.

Many folks in Twitterverse took the lawmaker's remarks as a way of using "nukes" to take away their guns. Although, the U.S. military has many weapons way more powerful than AR-15s and other semi-automatic weapons without going the nuclear option.

The NRA is based in Texas, and there's a saying down in the Lone Star State that goes, "Come and Take It." Though the saying goes back a couple of milleniums to King Leonidas and the Persian Army, Texans adopted the phrase during the Battle of Gonzales in the Texas revolution. "Come and Take It" has come to be known as defiance against someone's will to overtake them.

It looks like there are lots of Americans with the same sentiment.

An earlier version of this report did not contain information about the California representative's quote about using "nukes," but is now included in the current report.

Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell's Threat Of Gun Confiscation Didn't Go Over Well On Friday | U.S.