Disney Plus 'Star Wars' Alters Greedo & Han Solo Scene Again With 100 Percent More Maclunkey

Some were hopeful that the reunion of all Star Wars movies under one roof after The Walt Disney Company's acquisition of Fox and Lucasfilm could result in the return of the original versions of the movies, rather than the Star Wars "Special Editions" creator George Lucas larded with poor CGI and story changes for a 1997 theatrical re-release. Instead, it seems that, at least on the Disney Plus streaming service, Star Wars is further than ever from its original form.

One of the changes that most incensed Star Wars fans was made during an exchange in the 1977 original between smuggler pilot Han Solo (Harrison Ford) and bounty hunter Greedo (Paul Blake).

In the original version, Greedo corners Solo with a blaster and voices his intention to win the huge bounty on Solo's head. Surreptitiously, Solo prepares his own blaster beneath the cantina table.

"I've been looking forward to this for a long time," Greedo says.

"I bet you have," Solo says, then shoots Greedo, killing the bounty hunter instantly.

Lucas, worried the scene made Solo look too much like a "cold-blooded killer," used the 30th anniversary rerelease as an opportunity to correct the scene, using computer animation to depict Greedo firing first, with Solo dodging the shot with a jerky, unnatural motion of his head. In this version, Solo fires only in response to Greedo shooting first.

Fans, angered bythe story change and the terrible special effects used to alter it, defied the change, adopting the slogan "Han Shot First."

But instead of changing the scene back to its original form, the 2004 DVD release of the original Star Wars trilogy altered it once more, this time to depict Solo and Greedo firing simultaneously.

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Greedo confronts Han Solo in 1977's "Star Wars." Lucasfilm

On the Disney Plus streaming service — the Star Wars series newly launched home — the scene has been altered yet again. Solo's unbelievable, head-jerking dodge remains (though the shot has seemingly been shortened). But the weirdest change is the addition of a new shot, the camera returning to Greedo so he can utter a new line, which sounds like "Maclunkey."

Unlike the rest of Greedo's lines, the "Maclunkey" addition has no subtitles, so there's no way to know what Greedo's last word actually means, making the scene an even more bizarre viewing experience.

Other, more minor, changes separate the Disney Plus version of the original Star Wars, which appears to be a new scan of a film print, rather than a transfer of the Blu-ray edition. For example, the 20th Century Fox fanfare has been reinserted to the front of the movie, after its removal in the 2011 Blu-ray release (which had multiple tweaks of its own).

The altered version of Star Wars included with Disney Plus suggests there's no end in sight to the ongoing erasure of the original film. While projects like the Star Wars Despecialized Edition do the (unofficial) work of restoration and preservation, Star Wars as it was seen by theatergoers in 1977 remains unobtainable—an ongoing stain on the legacy of one of the most important movies in the history of American cinema.