Donald Trump’s Approval Rating Among Black Americans Is Actually Too Good to Be True

In the midst of ongoing racism allegations plaguing President Donald Trump by fired White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman, the president has continued to tout his approval rating among African Americans as being much higher than it really is.

The president shared a Rasmussen Reports poll Wednesday that showed his approval rating at 36 percent among black voters. The survey, which received a C+ rating from FiveThirtyEight on its accuracy, was picked up by conservative news outlets and Trump's supporters to show a public opinion shift among black Americans. 

An NAACP poll released August 7 showed the president’s approval among black voters at 21 percent.

But was either survey correct or accurate when compared to numerous other polls?

While the White House struggles to combat Manigault Newman's charges of Trump being a “racist” who used the n-word during his reality TV show The Apprentice, and with 2016 exit polls that showed only around 8 percent of black voters cast their ballots for him, it seems unlikely that one-third of African Americans currently support the president. Both polling numbers are much higher than more accurate polls have showed in recent months.

Gallup showed his current approval rating at 13 percent with an average fluctuation between 10 and 15 percent. Reuters also indicated a current approval rating of 13 percent among black voters with peaks of about 18 percent in February 2017 and May 2018. Numerous YouGov/Economist surveys from July and August also showed an average of a 13 percent approval rating. Only about 9 percent of black Americans approved of Trump in multiple Quinnipiac University surveys in the past two months.

Gallup, YouGov/Economist and Quinnipiac all received accuracy ratings of at least a B or better from FiveThirtyEight, with Reuters not listed as one of the survey organizations they currently rate.

In January, Trump falsely claimed his approval rating among black Americans had doubled.

The poll he was apparently referring to, conducted by SurveyMonkey, showed the president’s approval rating among black Americans had dropped from about 20 percent in February 2017 to 15 percent in December 2017. The Pew Research Center showed the same decline in his approval rating as well.

The president again falsely claimed during a National Rifle Association convention months later in May that his polling numbers doubled with black Americans, attributing his success to a black rapper, Kanye West.

“Kanye West must have some power,” Trump said at the time. “I doubled my African-American poll numbers. We went from 11 to 22 in one week. Thank you, Kanye, thank you.”

PolitiFact rated the claim “mostly false” because his approval rating only doubled among black men and did not include black women. The poll’s accuracy was also called into question because the sample size was too small and online respondents had the choice to opt-out, which is far less accurate than using a randomly generated survey population.

There could be more damaging news to come for the president from Manigault Newman's revelations. Reports from The New York Times and the Associated Press have claimed that Trump's former aide has more than 200 recordings, some of them videos, that may contain information about the president or those in his inner circle.

This story has been updated to include new reports about Omarosa Manigault Newman's revelations. 

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