U.S.

Donald Trump Jr. Mocks CNN Story Crediting Kim Jong Un’s Sister for North and South Korea Summit

President Donald Trump has been quick to take credit for a historic meeting between the leaders of North and South Korea and their joint pledge to bring an end to the decades-long war on the peninsula. Following in his father's footsteps, Donald Trump Jr. reacted with mockery to the suggestion that others may also be, at least in part, responsible.

On Friday, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un crossed the demarcation line to meet his South Korean counterpart, Moon Jae-in. A few hours later, Donald Trump Jr. quoted a CNN tweet that read, “Meet Kim Jong Un’s sister, widely seen as instrumental in making the summit happen,” adding a trio of crying laughing emojis and the words “I love you guys.”

 


 

Earlier, the president wasted no time in suggesting he was responsible for the summit.

"When I began, people were saying that was an impossibility," the president said Friday during a gathering with U.S. athletes who took part in the Winter Olympics in South Korea. "They said there were two alternatives: Let them have what they have, or go to war. And now we have a much better alternative than anybody thought even possible.”

Trump did share some of the credit around on Friday, tweeting his appreciation for China’s leader, Xi Jinping.

“Please do not forget the great help that my good friend, President Xi of China, has given to the United States, particularly at the Border of North Korea,” he wrote. “Without him it would have been a much longer, tougher, process!”

Trump is far from alone in suggesting he deserves the most appreciation for the talks.

"Clearly, credit goes to President Trump," South Korea’s Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha told CNN Thursday. "He's been determined to come to grips with this from day one."

But others played significant roles as well. Moon, elected as leader of South Korea last year, vowed to focus on opening diplomatic channels once again with the North. As for Kim Jong Un’s sister Kim Yo Jong, she was not just the only woman among the delegates at Friday’s historic summit; she also became the first member of North Korea’s ruling family to visit the South since the Korean War when she traveled to the Winter Olympics to deliver a letter from her brother in February.

Editor's Pick