Donald Trump Vows Tougher China Stance 'If and When I Win' 2020 Election

President Donald Trump has warned China that his second term in office would herald a much tougher approach to the ongoing trade war with Beijing. Trump sent his warning via Twitter while gloating about China's economic slowdown, claiming it as evidence that his wide-ranging trade war is working, Reuters reported.

Observers and officials have long suggested that the Communist Party regime in Beijing can better afford to play the long game, whether in terms of trade or other aspects of diplomacy and geopolitics. The authoritarian system of government means Chinese leaders have less need to set and deliver on short-term goals to garner greater public approval.

But Trump warned Tuesday that delaying any trade deal until after the 2020 election—in the hope that Americans will unseat the president—could backfire for Beijing.

Lauding what he said are the effects of his trade war, Trump declared that China "is doing very badly" even as the latest U.S-China trade talks began in Shanghai.

...to ripoff the USA, even bigger and better than ever before. The problem with them waiting, however, is that if & when I win, the deal that they get will be much tougher than what we are negotiating now...or no deal at all. We have all the cards, our past leaders never got it!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 30, 2019

"They should probably wait out our Election to see if we get one of the Democrat stiffs like Sleepy Joe," he mused. "Then they could make a GREAT deal, like in past 30 years, and continue to ripoff the USA, even bigger and better than ever before.

"The problem with them waiting, however, is that if & when I win, the deal that they get will be much tougher than what we are negotiating now…or no deal at all," the president added.

The U.S. has so far imposed tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods, with China reciprocating with import levies on $110 billion of U.S. goods.

Negotiations to find a way out of the confrontation have so far failed. China agreed to increase its purchases of U.S. agricultural goods as a goodwill gesture to reinvigorate talks, but Trump suggested Beijing appeared to be reneging on the pledge.

The president said China "was supposed to start buying our agricultural product now - no signs that they are doing so. That is the problem with China, they just don't come through."

Earlier this month, fresh economic data indicated that the Chinese economy is growing at its slowest rate since 1992. The country's National Bureau of Statistics said the economy grew 6.2 percent in the second quarter of 2019, slightly below the 6.4 percent growth of the first quarter of the year.

Trump was quick to claim credit. "This is why China wants to make a deal with the U.S. and wishes it had not broken the original deal in the first place," he wrote. "In the meantime, we are receiving Billions of Dollars in Tariffs from China, with possibly much more to come."

The president also falsely claimed that the tariffs are being paid for by China rather than by U.S. businesses and consumers in the form of higher prices on imported goods.

Donald Trump, China, trade war, 2020 election
President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on July 30, 2019. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty