Drunk Driver Calls Identical Twin To Collect Her—She Turns Up Drunk: Police

Police in Canada apprehended two identical twin sisters within an hour on Saturday, both of who were found to be driving drunk. The sisters were in two separate vehicles.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Burnaby, British Columbia, pulled over a 28-year-old woman at a drinking and driving roadblock on May 29, Cpl. Mike Kalanj told Kelowna Capital News.

A roadside test was administered and the driver was found to have a blood alcohol level higher than the legal limit. Police issued the woman with a 24-hour suspension from the road.

"She was told to call someone that hadn't been drinking to come and pick her up," Kalanj said.

The woman chose to contact her identical twin sister to collect her. She arrived on the scene at 5.23 a.m local time.

However, she was also drunk and police used a screening device to determine her blood alcohol level.

They found that her blood alcohol level was higher than her sister's. She was suspended from the road for three days. It's not clear how the sisters got home as neither of them could legally drive at the time.

"Two drivers on the road who shouldn't be," Kalanj said.

Burnaby RCMP described the incident on their Twitter account on June 1, calling the two suspended drivers "Identically Impaired." They painted a clear picture of the events.

"Identically Impaired"

Saturday

4:56 am:

Driver found impaired. 24 hour prohibition issued. She called someone to pick her up.

5:32 am:

Twin sister drives to scene. She is also found to be impaired. 3 day prohibition issued.

DON'T DRINK & DRIVE#BurnabyFrontline pic.twitter.com/o68rOT0Oto

— Burnaby RCMP (@BurnabyRCMP) June 1, 2021

"4:56 am: Driver found impaired. 24 hour prohibition issued. She called someone to pick her up," the police account wrote.

"5:32 am: Twin sister drives to scene. She is also found to be impaired. 3 day prohibition issued. DON'T DRINK & DRIVE."

Burnaby RCMP have made recent efforts to deal with distracted drivers as well. On May 28, police found 25 drivers who "could not #LeaveThePhoneAlone," while they stopped three impaired drivers on May 23, during National Impaired Driving Week.

Burnaby has a population of over 232,000 people based on 2016 figures. It's located in the Lower Mainland region of Canada's British Columbia province and is the province's third-largest city based on the number of residents.

According to a February report by Canada's National Post newspaper, drunk driving is the country's deadliest crime with the nation having the worst drunk driving death rate in the developed world. Deaths from drunk driving in Canada are estimated at 1,500 per year.

In the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) strongly advises against drinking and driving and doing so is illegal in every state.

"Driving after drinking is deadly. Yet it still continues to happen across the United States. If you drive while impaired, you could get arrested, or worse — be involved in a traffic crash that causes serious injury or death," the NTHSA website says.

"In 2019, there were 10,142 people killed in these preventable crashes. In fact, on average over the 10-year period from 2010-2019, more than 10,000 people died every year in drunk-driving crashes," the site says.

Newsweek has asked Burnaby RCMP for comment.

A Police Car Parked in Santa Fe
A police car with 'Emergency Dial 911' on its side parked in Santa FeAUGUST 17, 2019. Police in Canada found two identical twin sisters driving over the legal blood alcohol limit. Robert Alexander/Getty Images