'Enough Is Enough': Black Assistant Principal Hospitalized After Racial Harassment

An investigation into racial harassment was launched after a Black high school administrator in California was hospitalized for stress-induced seizures.

Dr. Elysse Versher, an assistant principal at West Campus High in Sacramento, was taken to Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center after experiencing a seizure days after her parking space was graffitied.

"I walked to where my assigned parking spot is and saw the 'n-word' five times - five times," Versher, who has worked for the school district for three years, told Sacramento station KXTV. Versher and her family's safety were also threatened.

The assistant principal was initially the target of racial harassment on social media for trying to enforce the school's dress code. Then, when she arrived to work on Monday, she saw that it was no longer just over the internet.

"I screamed. I just couldn't believe it," Versher responded when asked about her reaction to the graffiti near her spot.

A few days later, she experienced a stress-induced seizure for the first time.

"My wife suffered three seizures at work today. She was rushed to Kaiser. The stress of this racial terrorism has impacted her," a November 10 post on Versher's Facebook read. "Please pray for her!"

Earlier that morning, she also shared an article from Sacramento-based KTXL about her experience at work with a message about how hard it has been for her to process the hate crime that was committed.

"I'm reminded by my daughter that I am loved. I'm reminded by my husband that I am supported. I'm reminded by Black administrators across the country who have reached out to me ... that I am not alone," Versher wrote. "Enough is enough."

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Dr. Elysse Versher, an assistant principal at West Campus High in Sacramento, California, was taken to Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center after experiencing a stress-induced seizure days after she was the target of racist attacks online and in person. Pictured: Demonstrators gather with placards during a protest called by the 'Stand Up To Racism' group in Croydon, south London, in 2017, following the suspected hate crime attack on a 17-year-old Kurdish Iranian asylum-seeker. DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images

She told KXTV that Sacramento police have been responsive regarding the incident. The department and the Sacramento City Unified School District have opened an investigation into the online attacks and racist graffiti.

"Racism and racist language are deplorable, and hurtful to our entire community of students and staff, especially when directed at specific individuals," said Sacramento City Unified School District Superintendent Jorge A. Aguilar in a statement, and promised a full investigation.

Versher said that she'll continue speaking out until there's a lasting change from the school district.

"We're afraid that people will say you're playing the race card, and so we don't say anything," she told KXTV. "And I feel like being quiet has just given consent to this hate crime to just keep happening."

The school has not yet identified who is responsible for the racist graffiti.

Newsweek reached out to Versher and Principal John McMeekin for comment.