Federal Election Officials Blast Trump's 'Baseless Accusations' About Vote

Two senior federal election officials have defended the integrity of the voting process after President Donald Trump made unsubstantiated claims about voter fraud.

Ellen Weintraub, Commissioner of the Federal Election Commission, took to Twitter on Thursday to criticize the president's comments and accuse him of undermining the process.

"Enough, Mr. President. Enough. Spewing conspiracy theories regarding this election will not change the results," Weintraub wrote.

"The votes have all been cast. The votes will all be counted. The will of the people will prevail.

"Your lies undermine our democracy and harm our country. Just stop," she said.

"If you count the legal votes, I easily win," Trump said at the White House on Thursday.

"This is a case where they're trying to steal an election. They're trying to rig an election, and we can't let that happen," he said.

Weintraub has been FEC commissioner since 2002 and served under three presidents. She's also offered criticism of Trump in the past.

Ben Hovland, Commissioner of the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) also tweeted to defend the electoral process and election workers.

"Throughout my career, I have worked with elections administrators from across the country," Hovland said.

Throughout my career, I have worked with elections administrators from across the country.

They are Democrats, Republicans & Independents. They are dedicated public servants who conduct our elections with a fierce devotion to their responsibility to get it right.

/1

— Ben Hovland (@benhovland) November 6, 2020

"They are Democrats, Republicans & Independents. They are dedicated public servants who conduct our elections with a fierce devotion to their responsibility to get it right.

"They are among the finest Americans I know. No one should disparage their integrity with baseless accusations for their own political gain," Hovland said.

"Processing ballots takes time because security measures are in place to protect the integrity of the election."

The EAC was established by the Help America Vote Act of 2002 and, among other functions, it certifies voting equipment. Hovland was appointed by Trump to serve as one of four commissioners.

Weintraub retweeted Hovland's comments on Thursday shortly after her own tweet about the president's claims. Earlier, Weintraub had responded to a Trump tweet charging fraud by saying "Mr. President, elections are when the people speak, the leaders listen, and the election officials."

Trump tweeted early Friday morning claiming he had won the election and again suggesting there had been fraud.

"I easily WIN the Presidency of the United States with LEGAL VOTES CAST. The OBSERVERS were not allowed, in any way, shape, or form, to do their job and therefore, votes accepted during this period must be determined to be ILLEGAL VOTES. U.S. Supreme Court should decide!" he wrote.

Twitter flagged the president's tweet, advising users that "Some or all of the content shared in this Tweet is disputed and might be misleading about how to participate in an election or another civic process." The social media company has taken the same step with several of Trump's recent tweets.

 Trump Speaks in the Briefing Room
President Donald Trump speaks in the briefing room at the White House on November 5, in Washington, D.C. Votes are still being counted two days after the presidential election as incumbent Trump is in a close race against challenger Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, which remains too close to call. Election officials have defended the integrity of the process. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images