Gaming

‘Final Fantasy Brave Exvius' Nerfs Esther and Sylvie Before Patch Drops, Community Erupts

Some Final Fantasy Brave Exvius players are upset about the way two new characters have been  implemented into the mobile game.

The latest Spring Holiday Special patch added Esther and Sylvie, two holiday-themed fighters players can unlock by spending real-world money. Before the Banner event was implemented, data miners combed through the code to find out how strong each of the fighters were. This is a common practice when FFBE patches are announced, giving YouTube content creators, streamers and wiki editors time to dissect what’s being added.

FFBE is a gacha-based RPG, where the best characters have a very limited chance to appear. These limited-time events can cost $2.50 a pull, so acquiring a new character can demand a significant investment of money and time.Ending up with a rare five-star character is an awesome feeling, but some players report having spent thousands of dollars just on pulls.

30 minutes before the patch was to officially drop, a hotfix implemented by developer Gumi lowered the damage and power of both Esther and Sylvie. Players who saw the datamined content assumed both of these characters would be just as powerful when the patch went live, since that’s the way FFBE has always operated. Some players, redditors and YouTubers have said they feel betrayed by the change since the characters are no longer as viable.

The YouTube video announcing the event has twice as many dislikes as likes and is full of comments from agitated players. “I think we have the right to charge Gumi for false advertisement,” wrote one commenter. “They cannot change [the characters] at the last minute, that's unfair to the players that invest the most into the games,” wrote another.

The FFBE subreddit is just as angry, with the top posts all warning players not to pull during this Banner event. “I am okay with the banner nerf. What I'm not okay with is the way it was done,” wrote one player. “A nerf 30 minutes before they drop screams bait-and-switch, even if that wasn't the intention. Something as simple as an announcement both in game and on their social medias would have fixed it.”

Data mining involves obtaining the game’s code against the developer’s wishes to figure out the new features or characters soon to be implemented. It’s become practice for nearly every living game, with websites or content creators existing just to announce the findings. Developers aren’t always fans of data miners. The FFBE Terms of Service state players can’t “reverse engineer, decompile, disassemble, reverse assemble, hack, crack, or modify the Services source or object code.”

Square Enix and Gumi did not immediately return a request for comment from Newsweek .

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