Fox Host Laura Ingraham Shuts Door on Reparations: 'We Won, You Lost, That's That'

Fox News host Laura Ingraham accused reparations campaigners of wanting to live in a "fake world," suggesting they suck it up over the history of conquest and enslavement because "we won, you lost."

Ingraham made the comments during her podcast on Thursday after a hearing on Capitol Hill about the issue of reparations at which witnesses, including the writers Ta-Nehisi Coates and Coleman Hughes, gave evidence for and against.

"People would argue that the whole world, and I would, that the whole world has been reshaped by people taking other people's land. It's called conquest. It's called, you know—the Ottoman Empire had to shrink back," Ingraham said on the show. "We had a totally different map throughout Europe and Asia. That's just the way the world is. They want to live in a fake world.

"As Trump always says, you don't get do-overs. No do-overs, that's it. There was an argument sometime, I think it was the 1980s, there was a quote: 'You won, we lost, that's that.' Describing world politics. We won, you lost, that's that. That's just the way it is."

Ingraham called the mechanics of arranging reparations, such as identifying who should be entitled, "just preposterous."

"This idea of trying to divide the country up and I guess go through 23andMe and see who's what lineage and what percentage and when did you come here, and I guess come up with an algorithm," she said.

"Certain people get land and other people get cash and other people get opportunity—what is it? It's gonna breed resentment. This is my point. More resentment, less coming together. There's other people feel like they're working their butts off and all they are is called racist all day long for working their butts off."

The hearing on slavery reparations took place at the House of Representatives judiciary subcommittee on the constitution, civil rights and civil liberties on Thursday. The House is discussing H.R.40, a bill to establish a commission on reparations.

Fox News Laura Ingraham slavery reparations
Talk show host Laura Ingraham speaks during CPAC 2019 February 28, 2019 in National Harbor, Maryland. Ingraham said on her podcast that reparations don't matter because "we won, you lost, that's that." Alex Wong/Getty Images

Coates, an African-American author and writer, laid out the case for reparations as a witness at the hearing. "We recognize our lineage as a generational trust, as an inheritance. And the real dilemma posed by reparations is just that: A dilemma of inheritance. It is impossible to imagine America without the inheritance of slavery," Coates said, citing the boost slavery gave to America's economy.

"Enslavement reigned for 250 years on these shores. When it ended, this country could have extended its hallowed principles—life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness—to all, regardless of color. But America had other principles in mind. And so, for a century after the civil war, black people were subjected to a relentless campaign of terror."

Coleman Hughes, an African-American writer, spoke against blanket reparations for slavery, citing his own privileged upbringing as a reason he should not receive them despite being descended from slaves.

"If we were to pay reparations today, we would only divide the country further, making it harder to build the political coalitions required to solve the problems facing black people today," Hughes said.

"We would insult many black Americans by putting a price on the suffering of their ancestors. And we would turn the relationship between black Americans and white Americans from a coalition into a transaction—from a union between citizens into a lawsuit between plaintiffs and defendants."

Hughes added: "The question is not what America owes me by virtue of my ancestry; the question is what all Americans owe each other by virtue of being citizens of the same nation. And the obligation of citizenship is not transactional."

Fox Host Laura Ingraham Shuts Door on Reparations: 'We Won, You Lost, That's That' | Politics
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