Fox News' Sean Hannity Says He Doesn't Vet the Information He Gives Out: 'I Am Not Told What to Say'

Fox News host Sean Hannity has told viewers he does not vet the information he gives out on his program, and that he is not told what to say.

The veteran news anchor made the comments on his show Hannity on Monday night, as he criticized what he called "the media mob".

"We'll follow the facts. We'll highlight concerning allegations and irregularities. We'll also review some highly unusual voting patterns in America's swing states. Now, that's because we're not the media mob," Hannity said.

"This show, we, in this hour, I am not told what to say. I don't vet the information on this program that I give out," he added. "We have always been independent, follow our own path on the show. That's not going to change for me ever."

As Hannity made the remarks, an on-screen graphic contained the words: "Media Malpractice".

The anchor said his show would highlight "concerning allegations and irregularities," by reviewing what he called "highly unusual voting patterns" in swing states in the 2020 presidential election.

That claim came as Hannity railed against other members of the media for not taking President Donald Trump's claims of widespread voter fraud seriously.

A clip of the segment which features some of Hannity's comments has since been viewed more than 1.7 million times. It prompted criticism from some who took to social media to mock Hannity for appearing to admit he does not vet facts.

News commentator Keith Olbermann questioned whether Hannity did, in fact, know the meaning of the words he used.

"Spoiler Alert: I know him. Sean Hannity does not know what the word 'vet' means," Olbermann tweeted alongside a 15-second clip from the show.

Also sharing a clip, MSNBC producer Shea Olcheski wrote: "The guy who says the 'mainstream media' is fake news now says his show doesn't vet information. Classic Hannity."

Later, during the same show, Hannity made an on-air clarification.

Interviewing White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany, he said: "When I said I don't vet this program, I vet the program, we vet the facts.

"We got Obama right. We got Russia right. We got Ukraine right. We vetted Biden when nobody else would in the Biden family thing. We vet what we do. We're not told what to do. They get everything wrong every single time."

Hannity said his program did not have to vet information for an approved narrative nor evaluate if something would be accepted by viewers before being broadcast. In this sense, the host continued to assert, he does not vet for audience approval.

Hannity's comments came on the same day the host called on President Donald Trump to issue presidential pardons for himself and his entire family before leaving the White House in order to avoid potential legal prosecution by the incoming attorney general of President-elect Joe Biden.

During Thursday's The Sean Hannity Show on the Premiere Radio Networks, Hannity discussed a November 24 opinion article in The New York Times by Andrew Weissmann, deputy to former special counsel Robert Mueller. In it, Weissmann wrote that Biden's attorney general should investigate Trump.

In response, Hannity said, "The president out the door needs to pardon his whole family and himself, because [the Democrats) want this witch hunt to go on in perpetuity. They're so full of rage and insanity against the president."

"I assume that the power of the pardon is absolute," he continued, "and that he should be able to pardon anybody that he wants to."

Over the past month Hannity has been pushing unsubstantiated conspiracy theories about the presidential election.

Last week, Fox News settled a lawsuit with the family of murdered Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich over claims that Hannity and others at Fox News made about Rich's murder being a Democratic conspiracy of some kind, despite there being no evidence.

Newsweek has contacted the Hannity show and Sean Hannity for comment.

Sean Hannity
Fox News Host Sean Hannity told viewers that he doesn’t “vet the information on this program I give out". Paul Zimmerman/Getty